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Energy, Exergy and Economic Feasibility Analyses of a 60 MW Conventional Steam Power Plant Integrated with Parabolic Trough Solar Collectors Using Nanofluids

  • Muhammad Sajid Khan
  • Muhammad AbidEmail author
  • Tahir Abdul Hussain Ratlamwala
Research Paper

Abstract

The present study focuses on the detailed technical and cost-effective feasibility analyses of a 60 MWe steam power plant integrated with parabolic trough solar collectors. Aluminum oxide (Al2O3) nanoparticles are mixed with thermal oil to be used as a heat transfer fluid in the collector loops. The electric power is generated using steam Rankine cycle. For this purpose, the steam turbine of 60 MWe production capability of Teknecik power plant located in Northern Cyprus has been analyzed and an integrated solar steam turbine system is presented which generates electric power. Detailed energy and exergy assessment of the solar thermal plant is carried out. The important parameters are examined including overall energy and exergy efficiencies, exergy destruction rate and system performance by varying direct normal irradiation (DNI), mass flow rate of the collector, ambient and inlet temperatures. Furthermore, thermal power available from the solar field at various solar multiples is assessed, and levelized energy cost has been calculated. Results show that turbines are the main source of exergy destruction (63855 kW) followed by feedwater heaters and boiler. Overall energetic and exergetic efficiencies of the system are observed to be 22.64 and 23.83%, respectively. The integration of PTC system with conventional plant results in a reduction in fuel consumption which significantly brings down the CO2 emissions by almost 33%.

Keywords

Energy Exergy Parabolic trough collector Nanofluid Solar multiple Levelized electricity cost 

List of symbols

Aap

Aperture area (m2)

Ar

Receiver area (m2)

Ac

Collector area (m2)

C

Concentration ratio

Cp

Specific heat capacity (kJ/kg K)

D

Diameter (m)

\(\dot{E}x\)

Exergy rate (kW)

FR

Heat removal factor

Gb

Intensity of direct irradiation (W/m2)

hc, ca

Convective heat transfer coefficient from glass cover to ambient (W/m2 K)

hr, ca

Radiation heat transfer coefficient between ambient and cover (W/m2 K)

hr, cr

Coefficient of radiation heat transfer between cover and receiver (W/m2 K)

\(\kappa_{\gamma }\)

Incidence angle modifier

k

Thermal conductivity, (W/m K)

\(\dot{m}\)

Mass flow rate (kg/s)

Nu

Nusselt number

Pr

Prandtl number

\(\dot{Q}\)

Thermal energy produced (kW)

Re

Reynolds number

S

Radiations absorbed by receiver (W/m2)

Tc

Glass cover temperature (K)

Tr,av

Receiver average temperature (K)

Ta = T0

Ambient temperature (K)

TS

Sun Temperature (K)

UL

Overall heat loss coefficient of solar collector (W/m2K)

\(\dot{W}\)

Electricity/network output (kW)

Subscripts

ann

Annual

bf

Base fluid

b

Boiler

con

Condenser

c

Cover

col

Collector

en

Energy

ex

Exergy

hpt

High pressure turbine

Issp

Integrated solar steam turbine generation plant

In

Inlet

i

Inner

incr

Incremental

invest

Investment

lpt

Low pressure turbine

nf

Nanofluid

np

Nanoparticle

ov

Overall

o

Outer

O and M

Operation and maintenance

Ref

Reference

r

Receiver

s

Sun

sur

Surface

st

Steam

Sp

Steam turbine plant

th

Thermal

U

Utilization

Greek letters

\(\alpha\)

Absorbance of receiver

\(\gamma\)

Intercept factor

\(\epsilon\)

Emissivity

\(\eta\)

Efficiency

\(\theta\)

Incident angle, degrees

\(\mu\)

Dynamic viscosity, (Pa s)

\(\rho\)

Reflectance of mirror

\(\dot{\rho }\)

Density (kg/m3)

\(\sigma\)

Stefan-Boltzmann constant (W/m2-K4)

\(\tau\)

Transmittance of glass cover

\(\varphi\)

Percentage of nanoparticles

Acronyms

ASS

Annual solar share

Al2O3

Aluminum oxide

CFWH

Closed feedwater heater

DNI

Direct normal irradiation

HTF

Heat transfer fluid

LEC

Levelized electricity cost

OFWH

Open feedwater heater

PTC

Parabolic trough collector

SM

Solar multiple

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Copyright information

© Shiraz University 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of EngineeringEastern Mediterranean UniversityFamagusta, North Cyprus via Mersin 10Turkey
  2. 2.Department of Energy Systems Engineering, Faculty of EngineeringCyprus International UniversityNicosia, North Cyprus via Mersin 10Turkey
  3. 3.National University of Science and Technology, PNECKarachiPakistan

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