Stereological and Biochemical Effects of Curcumin on the l-Methionine-Induced Cardiotoxicity in Rats

Abstract

Homocysteine (Hcys) is a risk factor involved in the development of cardiovascular diseases. Hcys-induced oxidative stress has been proposed as a major mechanism contributing to the cardiotoxicity. Curcumin (CUR), a powerful antioxidant, exhibits cardioprotective activity against cardiotoxicity. The present study aimed to study the ameliorative action of CUR against cardiotoxicity induced by l-Methionine (MET), a precursor of homocysteine on stereological and biochemical parameters in rats.

Male rats were randomly assigned into control, MET (1 gr/kg/day), CUR (100 mg/kg/day) and MET + CUR groups. On day 29, all rats were anesthetized and their heart was removed for stereological and biochemical assessments. Stereological findings in MET group revealed a decrease by 12% and 35% in the volume of myocardium and microvessels, respectively compared to the control group. However, no significant change was observed in the total volume of connective tissue. The total number of cardiomyocytes nuclei showed a significant decrease by 23% compared to the control group. CUR could prevent changes in stereological parameters extensively in MET group (P < 0.01). CUR also ameliorated MET-induced lipid peroxidation (MDA), glutathione (GSH) depletion and a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) metabolites. Our findings suggest that CUR could prevent the structural disorder induced by MET in the rat cardiac tissues. The antioxidant properties of CUR seem to suppress the oxidative pathways that are activated by MET and lead to cardiac damage and dysfunction.

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Acknowledgements

This research was a part of Atefeh Rahimi’s M.Sc. thesis in Physiology and was financially supported by grant no. 96-01-02-14701from Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran.

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Correspondence to Saied Karbalay-Doust or Maryam Naseh.

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The authors declare that they do not have any conflict of interest.

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This study was approved by the Animal Care and Ethics Committee of the University (agreement license: 96-01-02-14701).

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Rahimi, A., Rafati, A., Noorafshan, A. et al. Stereological and Biochemical Effects of Curcumin on the l-Methionine-Induced Cardiotoxicity in Rats. Iran J Sci Technol Trans Sci 45, 841–847 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40995-021-01111-6

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Keywords

  • Homocysteine
  • l-Methionine
  • Curcumin
  • Cardiotoxicity
  • Stereology
  • Oxidative stress