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Journal of Child & Adolescent Trauma

, Volume 11, Issue 1, pp 99–112 | Cite as

Face-to-face and Cyber Victimization among Adolescents in Six Countries: The Interaction between Attributions and Coping Strategies

  • Michelle F. Wright
  • Takuya Yanagida
  • Hana Macháčková
  • Lenka Dědková
  • Anna Ševčíková
  • Ikuko Aoyama
  • Fatih Bayraktar
  • Shanmukh V. Kamble
  • Zheng Li
  • Shruti Soudi
  • Li Lei
  • Chang Shu
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of publicity (private, public) and medium (face-to-face, cyber) on the associations between attributions (i.e., self-blame, aggressor-blame) and coping strategies (i.e., social support, retaliation, ignoring, helplessness) for hypothetical victimization scenarios among 3,442 adolescents (age range 11–15 years; 49% girls) from China, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, India, Japan, and the United States. When Indian and Czech adolescents made more of the aggressor-blame attribution, they used retaliation more for public face-to-face victimization when compared to private face-to-face victimization and public and private cyber victimization. In addition, helplessness was used more for public face-to-face victimization when Chinese adolescents utilized more of the aggressor-blame attribution and the self-blame attribution. Similar patterns were found for Cypriot adolescents, the self-blame attribution, and ignoring. The results have implications for the development of prevention and intervention programs that take into account the various contexts of peer victimization.

Keywords

Cyber victimization Cyberbullying Victimization Coping Attribution Culture 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors have no conflicts of interest in the conduction of this research.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michelle F. Wright
    • 1
  • Takuya Yanagida
    • 2
  • Hana Macháčková
    • 1
  • Lenka Dědková
    • 1
  • Anna Ševčíková
    • 1
  • Ikuko Aoyama
    • 3
  • Fatih Bayraktar
    • 1
    • 4
  • Shanmukh V. Kamble
    • 5
  • Zheng Li
    • 6
    • 7
  • Shruti Soudi
    • 5
  • Li Lei
    • 6
  • Chang Shu
    • 6
  1. 1.Masaryk UniversityBrnoCzech Republic
  2. 2.University of Applied Sciences Upper AustriaWelsAustria
  3. 3.Shizuoka UniversityShizuokaJapan
  4. 4.Eastern Mediterranean UniversityFamagustaCyprus
  5. 5.Karnatak UniversityDharwadIndia
  6. 6.Renmin University of ChinaBeijingChina
  7. 7.University of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA

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