An Evaluation of Assistive Technology in Determining Job-Specific Preference for Adults With Autism and Intellectual Disabilities

Abstract

The transition to employment can be difficult for adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and intellectual disabilities (IDs). Currently, a limited number of ASD-specific career-planning tools exist within the literature, creating a challenge in terms of accurately identifying jobs that match individual preferences and strengths. This study evaluated the effects of a technology-based prework assessment on job performance among 3 adults with ASD and ID, aged 20–21 years prior to beginning supported employment. Three job conditions were established: a high-preference, high-skill-match job; a high-preference, low-skill-match job; and a low-preference, low-skill-match job. The 3 job conditions were evaluated using an alternating-treatments design with supported-employment sessions counterbalanced across a 6-week period. The results indicated that the high-preference job conditions produced higher levels of job performance irrespective of skill match. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.

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Correspondence to Jennifer Holloway.

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Walsh, E., Lydon, H. & Holloway, J. An Evaluation of Assistive Technology in Determining Job-Specific Preference for Adults With Autism and Intellectual Disabilities. Behav Analysis Practice 13, 434–444 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40617-019-00380-3

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Keywords

  • Technology
  • Autism
  • Intellectual disabilities
  • Employment
  • Preferences