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Current Environmental Health Reports

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 158–169 | Cite as

Environmental Exposures and Neuropsychiatric Disorders: What Role Does the Gut–Immune–Brain Axis Play?

  • Shannon Delaney
  • Mady Hornig
Mechanisms of Toxicity (CJ Mattingly and A Planchart, Section Editors)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Mechanisms of Toxicity

Abstract

Purpose of Review

Evidence is growing that environmental exposures—including xenobiotics as well as microbes—play a role in the pathogenesis of many neuropsychiatric disorders. Underlying mechanisms are likely to be complex, involving the developmentally sensitive interplay of genetic/epigenetic, detoxification, and immune factors. Here, we review evidence supporting a role for environmental factors and disrupted gut–immune–brain axis function in some neuropsychiatric conditions.

Recent Findings

Studies suggesting the involvement of an altered microbiome in triggering CNS-directed autoimmunity and neuropsychiatric disturbances are presented as an intriguing example of the varied mechanisms by which environmentally induced gut–immune–brain axis dysfunction may contribute to adverse brain outcomes.

Summary

The gut–immune–brain axis is a burgeoning frontier for investigation of neuropsychiatric illness. Future translational research to define individual responses to exogenous exposures in terms of microbiome-dependent skew of the metabolome, immunity, and brain function may serve as a lens for illumination of pathways involved in the development of CNS disease and fuel discovery of novel interventions.

Keywords

Gut–immune–brain axis Immunity Autoantibodies Microbiome Neuropsychiatric disorders 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not include any new studies performed by any of the authors using human or animal subjects.

References

Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: •• Of major importance

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryColumbia University Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Center for Infection and ImmunityColumbia University Mailman School of Public HealthNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of EpidemiologyColumbia University Mailman School of Public HealthNew YorkUSA

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