The role of co-living spaces in digital nomads’ well-being

Abstract

The rise of the digital labour market in recent years has stimulated the growth of the digital nomad community. To cater to this specific work-leisure segment, many co-living spaces are actively marketing their products to be the perfect accommodation solution to help overcome the isolation that urbanity and digital nomadism bring along. However, little research has been done to explore these new solutions of living circumstances and whether it enhances digital nomads’ lifestyle. This study is particularly interested in exploring the role of co-living spaces in digital nomads’ overall well-being. Through a grounded theory approach, 12 interviews with digital nomads living in co-living spaces are conducted and generated new insights. In doing so, the paper elaborates on the specific elements of co-living spaces that influence digital nomads’ experiences and subsequently explains how the elements of digital nomads’ overall well-being links to the neo-tribe theory. In the end, based on the neo-tribe characteristics exhibited by digital nomads, practitioners are given recommendations on how to improve the design and developments of co-living spaces to facilitate digital nomads’ well-being.

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Correspondence to Jennifer Sin Hung von Zumbusch.

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von Zumbusch, J.S.H., Lalicic, L. The role of co-living spaces in digital nomads’ well-being. Inf Technol Tourism (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40558-020-00182-2

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Keywords

  • Co-living spaces
  • Digital nomads
  • Grounded theory
  • Well-being
  • Neo-tribe