Evidence-based recommendations for resistance and power training to prevent frailty in community-dwellers

Abstract

Frailty is a reversible state of reduced resilience to stressful events resulting from a multisystem impairment of the human body. As frailty progresses, people become more vulnerable to numerous adverse events, including falls and fractures, cognitive decline, disability, hospitalization, nursing home placement, and death. As such, substantial health care costs are associated with frailty. These features have led to the recognition of frailty as a public health problem. The identification of strategies for the management of frailty has, therefore, become a topic of extensive instigation. In this context, resistance (RT) and power training (PT) have received considerable attention, and experts in the field have recently suggested that both training modalities may improve frailty-related parameters. However, most studies have only included robust people and investigated frailty as a secondary outcome, so that current literature only allows RT and PT preventive programs against frailty to be designed. Here, we provide evidence-based critical recommendations for the prescription of RT and PT programs against incident frailty in community-dwellers.

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Data availability

All the data used in the present work are available in the reference section.

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Funding

This work was supported by Innovative Medicines Initiative–Joint Undertaking, the nonprofit research foundation “Centro Studi Achille e Linda Lorenzon”, and by a scholarship to H.J.C.-J. from the Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior [CAPES; Finance Code 001]. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, preparation of the manuscript, or decision to publish.

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Coelho-Júnior, H.J., Uchida, M.C., Picca, A. et al. Evidence-based recommendations for resistance and power training to prevent frailty in community-dwellers. Aging Clin Exp Res (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40520-021-01802-5

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Keywords

  • Older adults
  • Physical performance
  • Cognitive function
  • Exercise prescription
  • Frailty