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Media Use Among Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder: a Systematic Review

  • Anja Stiller
  • Thomas Mößle
Review Paper
  • 169 Downloads

Abstract

Screen media has become an intrinsic feature in the daily lives of children and youths with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This systematic review provides a current overview concerning the significance of screen media in the lives of children and youths with ASD. For the years 2005 to 2016, we identified 47 studies covering media use among children and youths with ASD. These studies concordantly showed screen media as being a preferred leisure activity for children and youths with ASD, and reported mixed evidence compared to children without ASD. Further research on content, functionality, problematic media use, other leisure time activities, and quality of life is recommended.

Keywords

Media use Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) Leisure time Children Adolescents 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Anja Stiller is supported by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, Germany as part of the subproject media protect (01EL1424E) of the research consortium health literacy in childhood and adolescence. No conditions whatsoever were imposed with the financing. We thank Charlotte Franzke and Finja Strube for their support in conducting the systematic review.

Funding

Anja Stiller is supported by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, Germany as part of the subproject media protect (01EL1424E) of the research consortium health literacy in childhood and adolescence. No conditions whatsoever were imposed with the financing.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants performed by any of the authors of the present study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Criminological Research Institute of Lower Saxony (KFN)HanoverGermany
  2. 2.Autism Center Hannover (AZH)HanoverGermany
  3. 3.Police University of Applied Sciences Baden WuerttembergVillingen-SchwenningenGermany

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