The Benefits of Strength Training on Musculoskeletal System Health: Practical Applications for Interdisciplinary Care

Abstract

Global health organizations have provided recommendations regarding exercise for the general population. Strength training has been included in several position statements due to its multi-systemic benefits. In this narrative review, we examine the available literature, first explaining how specific mechanical loading is converted into positive cellular responses. Secondly, benefits related to specific musculoskeletal tissues are discussed, with practical applications and training programmes clearly outlined for both common musculoskeletal disorders and primary prevention strategies.

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LM and AT: concept, layout, and writing the first version of the manuscript. KP, CB and PR: writing, editing manuscript and tables. PC and TS: controlling and editing manuscript, figures and tables.

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Correspondence to Luca Maestroni.

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Luca Maestroni, Paul Read, Chris Bishop, Konstantinos Papadopoulos, Timothy J. Suchomel, Paul Comfort and Anthony Turner declare that they have no conflict of interest relevant to the content of this review.

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Maestroni, L., Read, P., Bishop, C. et al. The Benefits of Strength Training on Musculoskeletal System Health: Practical Applications for Interdisciplinary Care. Sports Med (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-020-01309-5

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