Dermatologic Laser Side Effects and Complications: Prevention and Management

Abstract

The evolution of modern laser and light-based systems has mirrored the demand for clinically effective treatments and the need for safer technologies with reduced postoperative recovery, side effects, and complications. With each new generation of lasers, more selective tissue destruction can be achieved with reduced unwanted sequelae. Patient selection and preparation, operator technique, and expeditious recognition and management of post-treatment side effects are paramount in avoiding complications and patient dissatisfaction. An overview of important variables to consider for dermatologic laser treatments are presented in order to provide a framework to reduce the severity and duration of possible post-treatment side effects and complications.

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Correspondence to Tina S. Alster.

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Alster, T.S., Li, M.K. Dermatologic Laser Side Effects and Complications: Prevention and Management. Am J Clin Dermatol (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40257-020-00530-2

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