Skip to main content

State energy policy in the Trump Era: insights from public opinion

Abstract

In light of President Trump’s decision to withdraw the USA from the Paris Accord and reverse a number of federal climate policies, many states and localities have pledged to increase their activities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This article discusses the policies that they are likely to consider, and uses national survey data to ascertain whether policymakers are likely to find support for each of these policy approaches among the general public.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Fig. 1
Fig. 2
Fig. 3
Fig. 4
Fig. 5
Fig. 6
Fig. 7
Fig. 8

References

  1. Amdur D, Rabe BG, Borick C (2014) Public views on a carbon tax depend on the proposed use of revenue. [a report from the National Surveys on Energy and Environment]. Ann Arbor, MI: The Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://closup.umich.edu/issues-in-energy-and-environmental-policy/13/public-views-on-a-carbon-tax-depend-on-the-proposed-use-of-revenue/

  2. Forster D, Smith DA (2015) Environmental policies on the ballot. In: Wolinsky-Nahmias Y (ed) Climate change politics: U.S. policies and civic action. Sage, Washington, D.C.

    Google Scholar 

  3. Lenferna A (2017) Washington State’s carbon tax initiative: lessons in getting carbon taxes via referendums. Public Administration Review Speak Your Mind Blog Commentary Symposium. Retrieved from https://publicadministrationreview.org/speak-your-mind-climate-change-symposium/

  4. Mills SB, Rabe BG, Borick C (2015) Cap-and-trade support linked to revenue use. [a report from the National Surveys on Energy and Environment]. Ann Arbor, MI: The Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://closup.umich.edu/issues-in-energy-and-environmental-policy/23/cap-and-trade-support-linked-to-revenue-use/

  5. Mills SB, Rabe BG, Borick C (2017) Strong public support for state-level policies to address climate change. [a report from the National Surveys on Energy and Environment]. Ann Arbor, MI: The Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://closup.umich.edu/issues-in-energy-and-environmental-policy/31/strong-public-support-for-state-level-policies-to-address-climate-change/

  6. National Conference of State Legislature (2017) Energy and environmental Legislation Database. Retrieved on 29 August 2017 from http://www.ncsl.org/research/energy/energy-environment-legislation-tracking-database.aspx

  7. Puskin D, Mills SB (2017) Moving the needle on American support for a carbon tax. [a report from the National Surveys on Energy and Environment]. Ann Arbor, MI: The Center for Local, State, and Urban Policy at the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan. Retrieved from http://closup.umich.edu/issues-in-energy-and-environmental-policy/30/moving-the-needle-on-american-support-for-a-carbon-tax/

  8. Rabe BG (2004) Statehouse and greenhouse: the emerging politics of American Climate Change Policy. Brooking Institution Press, Washington, DC

    Google Scholar 

  9. Rabe BG (2018) Can we price carbon? MIT Press, Cambridge, unpublished

  10. Raymond L (2016) Reclaiming the atmospheric commons. MIT Press, Cambridge

    Google Scholar 

  11. Selin H, VanDeveer SD (eds) (2009) Changing climates in North American politics: institutions, policymaking, and multilevel governance. MIT Press, Cambridge

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Sarah B. Mills.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Rabe, B.G., Mills, S.B. State energy policy in the Trump Era: insights from public opinion. J Environ Stud Sci 7, 535–539 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13412-017-0453-6

Download citation

Keywords

  • Climate policy
  • State policy
  • Public opinion
  • Carbon tax
  • Renewable energy