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Invertebrate borings from the Eocene of Seven Rivers, parish of St. James, western Jamaica

  • Stephen K. DonovanEmail author
  • Roger W. Portell
Regular Research Article
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Abstract

The fossil biota of the Eocene Yellow Limestone Group of Jamaica is diverse in vertebrates and, particularly, invertebrates. However, its invertebrate trace fossils remain understudied. Herein, we document the borings of the Seven Rivers vertebrate site in western Jamaica. This is in the Litchfield Formation, high in the Lutetian (about mid-Middle Eocene). The suite of borings identified from this site comprises Apectoichnus longissimus (Kelly and Bromley); Entobia isp.; Oichnus simplex Bromley; and Oichnus paraboloides Bromley. Substrates infested by Entobia isp. include both molluscs and sirenian ribs. Oichnus ispp. occur only in bivalves and are mainly non-penetrative, which may be a taphonomic artifact. Tubes of the common A. longissimus are preserved free from any woody substrates, which have presumably rotted away; however, one specimen has a dark, carbonaceous external film and others have carbonized wood inclusions. The occurrence of A. longissimus in the Jamaican rock record coincides with periods of sub-aerial exposure.

Keywords

Litchfield Formation Trace fossils Systematics Entobia Gastrochaenolites Apectoichnus 

Notes

Acknowledgements

Of the many colleagues who contributed to our fieldwork at Seven Rivers, in the present context we emphasize the zeal of the late H.L. (Hal) Dixon for collecting invertebrate body and trace fossils. We offer special thanks to Professor Simon F. Mitchell (University of the West Indies, Mona) for providing a pre-print of his paper. The supportive reviews of Drs John W.M. Jagt (Natuurhistorisch Museum Maastricht, The Netherlands) and Donovan J. Blissett (University of the West Indies, Mona) are gratefully acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Akademie der Naturwissenschaften Schweiz (SCNAT) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Taxonomy and Systematics GroupNaturalis Biodiversity CenterLeidenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Earth SciencesUniversity of New BrunswickFrederictonCanada
  3. 3.Florida Museum of Natural HistoryUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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