In-vitro biotransformation of tea using tannase produced by Enterobacter cloacae 41

Abstract

Tannase is a widely used enzyme that improves the quality of tea by facilitating the release of water-soluble polyphenolic compounds, as well as reduces the formation of tea creams. The microbial tannase enzymes are often employed for tea biotransformation by hydrolyses esters of phenolic acids, including the gallated polyphenols found in blacks teas. The study was focused to investigate the tannase enzyme mediated biotransformation of black tea such as CTC-(Crush, tear, curl) & Kangra orthodox which are commonly used by the south Indian peoples. HPLC spectral analysis revealed that tannase treatment on tea cream formation (CTC & Kangra orthodox tea) allows the hydrolysis of the EGC, GA, ECG, and EGCG. A significant reduction in the formation of tea cream and increased antioxidant activity has been observed in the CTC (1.62 fold) and Kangra orthodox (1.55 fold). The results revealed that tannase treatment helps to improve the quality of black tea infusions with respect to cream formation, the intensity of colour, and sensory characteristics of tea. The result of this study indicates that E. cloacae 41 produced tannase can be used to improve the quality of both tea samples.

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Acknowledgement

The authors would like to thank Division of Biotechnology, School of Agro-Industry, Faculty of Agro-Industry, Chiang Mai University, for their facilities. We also acknowledge to Science and Technology Park, Chiang Mai University, Thailand.

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Contributions

RKG: Supervision, Resources, Investigation, Formal analysis, Methodology, Writing–original draft. CK: Supervision, Resources, Investigation, Formal analysis, Methodology, Writing–original draft. KM: Writing–review & editing, Data curation, Writing–original draft. DJHS: Methodology, Software, Validation. Formal analysis. KPS and SM: Data curation, Methodology, Validation.

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Correspondence to Rasiravathanahalli Kaveriyappan Govindarajan or Chartchai Khanongnuch.

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Govindarajan, R.K., Khanongnuch, C., Mathivanan, K. et al. In-vitro biotransformation of tea using tannase produced by Enterobacter cloacae 41. J Food Sci Technol (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13197-021-05018-3

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Keywords

  • Enterobacter cloacae 41
  • Tannase enzyme
  • CTC
  • Kangara orthodox
  • HPLC
  • DPPH