Recurrent Bilateral Mucinous Cystadenoma: Laparoscopic Ovarian Cystectomy with Review of Literature

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Abstract

The second most common epithelial tumor of the ovary is the mucinous tumors, and it constitutes about 8–10% of all ovarian tumors. The recurrence of mucinous cystadenoma is very rare after complete excision. Few cases have been reported. The case presented had initial surgery for adenxal mass diagnosed as mucinous tumor, performed by laparotomy and was followed up. After recurrence, the patient underwent laparoscopic evaluation and bilateral ovarian cystectomy was performed as a fertility preservation for the patient young age. The histopathological diagnosis was mucinous cystadenoma, the same as the initial one. Management in young patients is challenging, especially in the case of recurrence. Follow-up of these patients is very important and transvaginal ultrasound seems to be currently the most effective diagnostic tool for the follow-up of young patients treated with cystectomy for benign mucinous cystadenomas. Total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy is recommended after completing family size or reaching age of 35 for fear of progression or incompliance.

Keywords

Recurrent Mucinous Cystadenoma Laparoscopy Cystectomy 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interests

The author declares that he has no conflicts of interest.

Details of Ethics Approval

Approval of the medical ethics committee of the Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, was obtained before committing the research and the supporting documents are available on request.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from the patient included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Indian Association of Surgical Oncology 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of MedicineEl-Shatby Maternity University Hospital, Alexandria UniversityAlexandriaEgypt

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