Structural Equation Model Predicting LGB Ally Behaviors in Heterosexuals

Abstract

Introduction

While numerous studies have focused on heterosexuals’ attitudes toward lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals, few studies have examined ally behaviors and their predictors. The present study aimed to model the connections between LGB interpersonal contact and heterosexism in relation to ally behaviors among heterosexuals.

Methods

Heterosexual adults (n = 333) completed an online survey assessing interpersonal contact with LGB individuals, heterosexism, and ally behaviors.

Results

A good-fitting structural equation model showed significant direct effects (all ps < 0.001) from LGB contact to heterosexism (β = − 450), from heterosexism to ally behaviors (β = − 0.280), and from LGB contact to ally behaviors (β = 0.594). There was a significant indirect (mediational) effect from LGB contact to ally behaviors through heterosexism (β = 0.126, p = .001).

Conclusion

The results inform targets for interventions with heterosexuals, such as the facilitation of interpersonal contact between LGB and heterosexuals to reduce prejudice and increase ally behaviors.

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Fig. 1

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Correspondence to Paul B. Perrin.

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Henry, R.S., Smith, E.R., Perrin, P.B. et al. Structural Equation Model Predicting LGB Ally Behaviors in Heterosexuals. Sex Res Soc Policy (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13178-020-00461-x

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Keywords

  • Heterosexism
  • Prejudice
  • LGBT
  • Ally
  • Prejudice