Morpho-physiological response of common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) to flooding stress at different growth stages

Abstract

Flooding is one of the major abiotic stresses which accounts for considerable damage to plant growth and development and induces multiple morpho-physiological dysfunctions in many crop plants, including buckwheat. The present study aimed to elucidate the potential stage and duration of waterlogging treatment during the various stage that had the most severe effect on yield in common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum cv. Harunoibuki). The plants were subjected to flooding stress during 3 days at ES, MS, and FS with 5 cm of water depth. The results showed that the plant height, SPAD (soil plant analysis development) value, chlorophyll fluorescence, root analysis (length, surface area, and volume), and dry weight were found to be influenced when plants were exposed to flooding stress at each stage. Here it was demonstrated that root parameters were more impaired by flooding stress than shoot parameters. The findings concluded that early growth stage was more sensitive regarding physiological characteristics (value of SPAD and chlorophyll fluorescence) and root morphology (root length, surface area, volume, and dry weight) under flooding stress in common buckwheat.

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Abbreviations

DAS:

Days after seeding

ES:

Early growth stage

MS:

Maximum vegetative growth stage

FS:

Flowering stage

Fv/Fm:

Maximum quantum yield of PS2 photochemistry

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Acknowledgements

We thank Professor Jun-Ichi Sakagami for providing us the experimental materials and aiding technical supports during the experiment period.

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Correspondence to Sun-Hee Woo or Jun-Ichi Sakagami.

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The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest.

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Choi, J., Cho, S., Chun, J. et al. Morpho-physiological response of common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) to flooding stress at different growth stages. J. Crop Sci. Biotechnol. (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12892-020-00044-7

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Keywords

  • Common buckwheat (fagopyrum esculentum)
  • Flooding stress
  • Morpho-physiological alterations
  • Growth stages