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Conservation Genetics Resources

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 173–177 | Cite as

Characterization of the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Asiatic toad Bufo gargarizans (Amphibia, Anura, Bufonidae) with phylogenetic analysis

  • Lichun Jiang
  • Min Zhang
  • Jie Liu
  • Lin Ma
  • Peng Yu
  • Qiping Ruan
Technical Note
  • 62 Downloads

Abstract

The Asiatic toad Bufo gargarizans belongs to Bufonidae. This species is known from the Russian Far East, central, northern and north-eastern China, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea and Japan. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of B. gargarizans was sequenced. The mitogenome was 17,407 bp in length, consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, two ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, and a non-coding control region. As in other vertebrates, most mitochondrial genes are encoded on the heavy strand, except for ND6 and eight tRNA genes which are encoded on the light strand. The overall base composition of the B. gargarizans is 28.9% A, 28.2% T, 27.5% C and 15.3% G. Phylogenetic analysis showed B. gargarizans was closely related to B. bankorensis and B. tuberculatus. The complete mitogenome of B. gargarizans can provide an important data for the studies on phylogenetic relationship and population genetics to further explore the taxonomic status of this species.

Keywords

Bufo gargarizans Bufonidae Complete mitochondrial genome Protein-coding genes 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by the Research Project of Ecological Security and Protection Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province (No. ESP1410), Scientific Research Foundation Projects of Mianyang Normal University (No. QD2015A003), Education Office Project of Sichuan Province (No. 15ZB0279), Research Center Project of Ecological Agriculture and Animal Husbandry in Northwest Sichuan (No. 075019), the Scientific Research Fund of Mianyang Normal University (No. 2014A05) and Innovative and Entrepreneurship Training Program for College Students (No. 2017CXCY022, 2017CXCY031).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors report no conflicts of interest, and are alone responsible for the content and writing of the paper.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lichun Jiang
    • 1
  • Min Zhang
    • 1
  • Jie Liu
    • 1
  • Lin Ma
    • 1
  • Peng Yu
    • 1
  • Qiping Ruan
    • 1
  1. 1.Key Laboratory for Molecular Biology and Biopharmaceutics, School of Life Science and TechnologyMianyang Normal UniversityMianyangPeople’s Republic of China

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