The Buddha and His Son

Abstract

This article surveys interactions between the Buddha and his son as reported in Pāli discourses and their parallels. Although by going forth as monastics both had left behind the secular setting of family life, the teachings the Buddha gave to Rāhula can be taken to exemplify qualities relevant to mindful parenting. Besides, teaching emerges as an activity that facilitates not only the progress of others to liberation but can also achieve the same purpose for the one who gives such teachings.

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Abbreviations

AN:

Aṅguttara-nikāya

D:

Derge edition

DĀ:

Dīrgha-āgama (T 1) DN Dīgha-nikāya

EĀ:

Ekottarika-āgama (T 125)

Jā:

Jātaka

MĀ:

Madhyama-āgama (T 26)

MN:

Majjhima-nikāya

P:

Peking edition

Ps:

Papañcasūdanī

SĀ:

Saṃyukta-āgama (T 99)

SN:

Saṃyutta-nikāya

Sp:

Samantapāsādikā

T:

Taishō edition

Vin:

Vinaya

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Correspondence to Bhikkhu Anālayo.

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Anālayo, B. The Buddha and His Son. Mindfulness 12, 269–274 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-020-01394-7

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Keywords

  • Awakening
  • Buddha’s Son
  • Falsehood
  • Not Self
  • Rāhula
  • Renunciation
  • Teaching