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BioNanoScience

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 418–422 | Cite as

Treatment of Tension-Type Headaches in Adolescents (14–15 Years Old): the Efficacy of Aminophenylbutyric Acid Hydrochloride

  • Oleg Radievich Esin
Article
  • 26 Downloads

Abstract

The paper represents a modern view on the problem of tension-type headache (TTH) in adolescents, which is caused by the following factors: information overload and other types of stress, sleep deprivation, and physical activity deficiency, impaired posture with myogenic trigger points developing. The research covered 64 adolescents aged 14–15 with tension-type headaches: 33 boys and 42 girls (11 boys and 20 girls with frequent episodic tension-type headache (ETTH) and 12 boys and 21 girls with chronic tension-type headache (CTTH)). We assessed accompanying symptoms over the last 6 months according to the Likert scale. All children were prescribed GABA receptor agonist—aminophenylbutyric acid hydrochloride 250 mg three times a day for 3 weeks. The reduction of tension-type headache intensity was assessed by 3-grade scale: “no change,” “significantly reduced,” and “completely stopped”: 0—no, 1—very seldom, 2—often, and 3—permanently. ETTH/CTTH associated symptoms are as follows: (1) difficulty of falling asleep and restless sleep (0.91 ± 0.83/1.54 + 1.26), (2) difficulty of concentrating during the day (0.61 + 0.92/2.04 + 1.21), (3) morning sickness (0.32 + 0.87/1.81 + 1.29), (4) feeling ill in the morning with improvement in the second half of the day (0.17 + 0.57/1 95 + 0.95), (5) meteosensitivity (0.58 + 1.01/1.59 + 1.22), and (6) decrease in physical capability (0.20 + 0.64/1.72 + 0.82). After 3 weeks, the pain in ETTH subgroup completely stopped in 27 children (79%) and significantly reduced in 7 (21%). In CTTH subgroup, the pain completely stopped in 9 children (41%) and significantly reduced in 13 (59%). Associated symptoms of ETTH/CTTH are as follows: (1) difficulty of falling asleep and restless sleep (0.26 + 0.44, p = 0.000093/0.45 + 0.80, p = 0.000224), (2) difficulty of concentrating during the day (0.17 + 0.38, p = 0.003707/0.54 + 0.85; p = 0.000007), (3) morning sickness (0.08 + 0.28, p = 0. 058101/0.77 + 1.06, p = 0.001682), (4) feeling ill in the morning with improvement in the second half of the day (0.08 + 0.28, p = 0.083119/0.27 + 0.45; p = 0.000000), (5) meteosensitivity (0.32 + 0.63, p = 0.010304/1.36 + 1.09, p = 0.021450), and (6) decrease in physical capability (0.058 + 0 23; p = 0.133706 / 0.95 + 1.04, p = 0.005055). Aminophenylbutyric acid hydrochloride (GABA receptor agonist) reduces the intensity of tension-type headache and has a positive effect on associated symptoms. It can be recommended for inclusion into the scheme of tension-type headache treatment in schoolchildren.

Keywords

Headache Tension-type headache Adolescents Stress Aminophenylbutyric acid hydrochloride 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The reported study was supported by the program of competitive growth of Kazan Federal University.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratory of Clinical LinguisticsKazan Federal UniversityKazanRussian Federation
  2. 2.University ClinicKazan Federal UniversityKazanRussian Federation
  3. 3.Department of Russian Language and Applied LinguisticsKazan Federal UniversityKazanRussian Federation
  4. 4.Institute of Fundamental Medicine and BiologyKazan Federal UniversityKazanRussian Federation

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