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BioNanoScience

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 467–472 | Cite as

Whether Medical Schools in Russia Are Ready to Develop Successfully in the Twenty-first Century

  • Andrey Kiassov
  • Anisa Gumerova
  • Sayar Abdulkhakov
  • Rashat Faizullin
  • Marat Mrasov
  • Lenar Rashitov
  • Raushania Gaifullina
  • Rezeda Khasanova
  • Julia Oslopova
  • Albert Rizvanov
Article

Abstract

The main purpose of this work was to analyze the situation of the readiness of Russian medical schools to develop and implement new technologies such as bionanotechnology and technologies born as the result of the genome and the fourth industrial revolutions, which are at the intersection of various sciences and can become a breakthrough in the development of future medicine. The development of medical schools in Russia, special features of Russian medical education, types of medical schools, and their effectiveness at the present time are considered in the paper. However, the most interesting development of new technologies is that of the “fundamental specialties” of training in higher education—medical biochemistry, medical biophysics, and medical cybernetics. We assert that Russian medical schools attached to large, traditional universities, thanks to multidisciplinarity and convergence in scientific research and in education, are the most prepared to solve the tasks posed by the global challenges of our time.

Keywords

Medical education Medical schools Biomedical research Translational medicine 

Notes

Funding Information

This work is performed with the support of the state subsidy allocated to Kazan Federal University for the performance of the state task in the sphere of scientific activity (18.4495.2017 / 5.1).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrey Kiassov
    • 1
  • Anisa Gumerova
    • 1
  • Sayar Abdulkhakov
    • 1
  • Rashat Faizullin
    • 1
  • Marat Mrasov
    • 1
  • Lenar Rashitov
    • 1
  • Raushania Gaifullina
    • 1
  • Rezeda Khasanova
    • 1
  • Julia Oslopova
    • 1
  • Albert Rizvanov
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Fundamental Medicine and BiologyKazan Federal UniversityKazanRussia

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