Psoroptes mites infestation in a captive Burmese Red Serow (Capricornis sumatraensis subspecies rubidus) of Indo-Burma bio-diversity hotspot

  • Nirali Shah
  • Dhrubajyoti Borpojari
  • Kalyan Sarma
  • M. Ayub Ali
  • Basanta Saikia
  • Hitesh Bayan
  • Fazal Ali Ahmed
  • Gunjan Das
Short Communication
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Abstract

An 8 years old male Burmese Red Serow (Capricornis sumatraensis sub species rubidus) from Aizawl Zoological Park was presented to the Teaching Veterinary Clinical Complex. An exploratory skin scraping revealed existence of nymphal as well as adult stages of mites of the Psoroptes spp. which were not associated with any overt lesions typical to mite infestation such as pruritus, erythema or scaling of the epidermis. The mites were identified as per their morphology, size and shape. Haemato-biochemical analysis revealed alteration of certain haematological and biochemical parameters. The red blood corpuscles were found to have anucleate cells with mild to absent central pallor. The absolute counts showed neutrophilic leucocytosis with mild monocytosis and lymphocytosis. Eosinophilic count was towards the higher side, indicating that the infestation was mild. The serum calcium, albumin, triglyceride, urea nitrogen (BUN) were found to be lower than normal, whereas serum ALT, AST, LDH, ALP and serum amylase were higher than the established reference indices. Due to lack of haemato-biochemical reference values specific to captive Serow, emphasis was given in this report to establish baseline data for this species.

Keywords

Psoroptes mites Captive Burmese Red Serow Indo-Burma biodiversity hotspot Haemato-biochemical parameters 

Notes

Authors contributions

All the authors performed the clinical examination, developed the diagnosis, designed the treatment of the animals, summarized the results of the cases and drafted the manuscript, performed the dermatological skin examination, skin sampling and microscopic analysis and drafted parts of the manuscript. All authors contributed to the development and the revisions of the manuscript and approved the final version.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Indian Society for Parasitology 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nirali Shah
    • 1
  • Dhrubajyoti Borpojari
    • 2
  • Kalyan Sarma
    • 1
  • M. Ayub Ali
    • 3
  • Basanta Saikia
    • 4
  • Hitesh Bayan
    • 4
  • Fazal Ali Ahmed
    • 2
  • Gunjan Das
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Veterinary Medicine College of Veterinary Sciences and Animal HusbandryCentral Agricultural University, SelesihAizawlIndia
  2. 2.Department of Animal Reproduction, Gynaecology and Obstetrics, College of Veterinary Sciences and Animal HusbandryCentral Agricultural University, SelesihAizawlIndia
  3. 3.Department of Veterinary Physiology and Biochemistry, College of Veterinary Sciences and Animal HusbandryCentral Agricultural University, SelesihAizawlIndia
  4. 4.Department of Veterinary Surgery and Radiology, College of Veterinary Sciences and Animal HusbandryCentral Agricultural University, SelesihAizawlIndia

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