The Predictive Value of Sarcopenia and its Individual Criteria for Cardiovascular and All-Cause Mortality in Suburb-Dwelling Older Chinese

Abstract

Objectives

The aim of the present study is to investigate the associations between the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia (AWGS) sarcopenic definition, and its individual criteria, and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality in the Chinese elderly.

Methods

Longitudinal analysis of 1,264 participants aged 60 years or older at baseline (2013–2014) living in suburban areas, China. Sarcopenia was defined according to the recommended algorithm of AWGS. Muscle mass was measured by a direct segmental multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis. Muscle strength was assessed by handgrip strength, and physical performance measured via usual walking speed.

Results

Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the risk of CVD and all-cause mortality. After 40 months of follow-up, forty-eight deaths (4.2%) died in this cohort. The mortality rate with sarcopenia was 4.7% in men and 3.8% in women. After adjusting for potential confounders, the risk of all-cause death was 4.15 times higher in subjects with sarcopenia. Furthermore, low muscle mass (HR: 2.62, 95% CI 1.34–5.13) and low grip strength (HR: 5.79; 95% CI 2.28–14.71), but not walking speed, were found to be significantly associated with all-cause mortality. Risk of CVD mortality was significantly greater in sarcopenia. Low grip strength and low walking speed were associated with 11 times (HR: 11.03, 95% CI 1.58–77.02) and 13 times (HR: 13.02; 95% CI 1.18–143.78) higher risk of CVD mortality.

Conclusions

Sarcopenia and components of sarcopenia were associated with greater CVD and all-cause mortality. Pertinent prevention or rehabilitation programs projects should look to promote healthy aging in different types of sarcopenia group.

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Funding

Sources of Funding: This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grant numbers 81372118).

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Correspondence to Qi Guo.

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Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Ethical Standards: The experiments comply with the current laws of the country in which they were performed.

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Han, P., Chen, X., Yu, X. et al. The Predictive Value of Sarcopenia and its Individual Criteria for Cardiovascular and All-Cause Mortality in Suburb-Dwelling Older Chinese. J Nutr Health Aging 24, 765–771 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12603-020-1390-8

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Key words

  • Sarcopenia
  • components
  • CVD mortality
  • all-cause mortality
  • Chinese