Application of the DPSIR Framework to Coastal and Marine Fisheries Management in Kenya

Abstract

Natural resource management frameworks are important in generating information that promotes the development of appropriate policies and regulation for effective management and utilization of different aspects of ecosystems. The Drivers-Pressure-State-Impact and Response (DPSIR) framework is one of such frameworks which has been widely applied globally in assessing, addressing and communicating with regard to environmental problems. This framework provides a nexus between the causes of environmental problems and the resultant pressures, associated impacts and responses needed to resolve and manage specific environmental issues and challenges. Based on improved management evidence for natural resources enabled by the application of the DPSIR framework globally, this paper is a review of the application of the framework in the management of coastal and marine fisheries resources in Kenya. Findings indicate that there exists a limited number of studies which have adopted the DPSIR framework approach in Kenya, and these are mainly focused on terrestrial ecosystems. However, coastal and marine resources have been well studied in Kenya using different methodological approaches that have given insights into the conditions of resources. This review, therefore, analyzed these studies to understand drivers, pressures, states, impacts and responses in relation to coastal and marine fisheries resources in Kenya. The main drivers observed were a high population growth rate of 3.7% as well as a high dependency rate on natural resources of 74% and 58% in Ngomeni and Kipini fishing areas of north coast Kenya, respectively. There is also a lack of understanding regarding the potential of the DPSIR framework to effectively manage coastal and marine fisheries resources, particularly in the context of sub-Saharan Africa, taking Kenya as a case study. This may result in the development of fisheries regulations that are not holistic in their approach, and therefore, ineffective from a management perspective. Within this context, this paper provides a discourse on how the DPSIR framework may enhance coastal and marine fisheries resources management in Kenya.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Aloo PA, Munga CN, Kimani EN, Ndegwa S (2014) A review of the status and potential of the coastal and marine fisheries resources in Kenya. Int J Mar Sci 4:1–9

    Google Scholar 

  2. Carr ER, Wingard PM, Yorty SC, Thompson MC, Jensen NK, Roberson J (2007) Applying DPSIR to sustainable development. Int J Sust Dev World 14:543–555

    Google Scholar 

  3. Cowan JH, Rice JC, Walters CJ, Essington TE, Hilborn R, Day JW, Boswell KM (2012) Challenges for implementing an ecosystem approach to fisheries management. In: Noakes D (ed) Marine and coastal fisheries: Dynamics, management, and ecosystem science. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda, pp 496–510

    Google Scholar 

  4. Dzoga M, Simatele D, Munga C (2018) Assessment of ecological vulnerability to climate variability on coastal fishing communities: A study of Ungwana Bay and Lower Tana Estuary, Kenya. Ocean Coast Manage 163:437–444

    Google Scholar 

  5. Dzoga M, Simatele DM, Munga C (2019) Climate variability and small-scale fisheries in Kenya: Characterization of current socio-economic conditions of artisanal fishing communities in Ungwana Bay and the Lower Tana Delta. Int J Environ Sci Nat Resour 17:555971. doi:https://doi.org/10.19080/IJESNR.2019.17.555971

    Google Scholar 

  6. Elliott E, Burdon D, Atkins JP, Borja A, Cormier R, de Jonge VN, Turner RK (2017) “And DPSIR begat DAPSI(W)R(M)!” — A unifying framework for marine environmental management. Mar Pollut Bull 118:27–40

    Google Scholar 

  7. FAO (2003) The ecosystem approach to fisheries. FAO, Rome, FAO technical guidelines for responsible fisheries No. 4, 112 p

    Google Scholar 

  8. FAO (2005) Putting into pactice the ecosystem approach to fisheris. FAO, Rome, 76 p

    Google Scholar 

  9. Fondo EN, Kimani EN, Munga CN, Aura CM, Okemwa G, Agembe S (2014) A review on Kenyan fisheries research: 1970–2009. WIO J Mar Sci 13:143–162

    Google Scholar 

  10. Gari SR, Guerrero CEO, Uribe BA, Icely JD, Newton A (2018) A DPSIR — Analysis of water uses and related water quality issues in the Colombian Alto and Medio Dagua Community Council. Water Sci 32:318–337

    Google Scholar 

  11. GOK (2007) Fisheries (Beach Management Unit) Regulations, Revised 2012. Laws of Kenya, Government of Kenya, 163 p

    Google Scholar 

  12. GOK (2008) National oceans and fisheries policy. Government of Kenya, Nairobi, 29 p

    Google Scholar 

  13. GOK (2010) The prawn fisheries management plan. Government of Kenya, Nairobi

    Google Scholar 

  14. GOK (2012) A baseline report for the Kenyan small and medium marine pelagic fishery. Government of Kenya, Nairobi, 74 p

    Google Scholar 

  15. GOK (2013) Integrated coastal zone management. Government of Kenya, Nairobi

    Google Scholar 

  16. GOK (2014) Marine artisanal fisheries frame survey 2014 report. Government of Kenya, Nairobi, 88 p

    Google Scholar 

  17. GOK (2015a) Fisheries annual statistical bulletin 2015. State Department for Fisheries and the Blue Economy, Nairobi, 61 p

    Google Scholar 

  18. GOK (2015b) The Malindi — Ungwana Bay fishery co — Management plan (2016–2021). Government of Kenya, Nairobi, 33 p

    Google Scholar 

  19. GOK (2016) Marine artisanal fisheries frame survey 2016 report. Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries, State Department of Fisheries. Government of Kenya, Nairobi, 105 p

    Google Scholar 

  20. Gracia SM, Zerbi A, Aliaume C, Do Chi T, Lasserre G (2003) The ecosystem approach to fisheries: Issues, terminology, principles, institutional foundations, implementation and outlook. Rome, FAO, FAO Fisheries Technical Paper No. 443, 71 p

    Google Scholar 

  21. Hoof L, Steins NA (2017) Mission report Kenya; Scoping mission marine fisheries Kenya. Wageningen Marine Research, Wageningen, Wageningen Marine Research Report C038.17, 136 p

    Google Scholar 

  22. Islam MN, Kitazawa D, Runfola DM, Giner NM (2012) Urban lakes in a developing nation: Drivers, states and impacts of water quality and quantity in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Lakes Reserv Res Manag 17:253–263

    Google Scholar 

  23. Kagalou I, Leonardos I, Anastasiadou C, Neofytou C (2012) The DPSIR approach for an integrated river management framework. A preliminary application on a mediterranean site (Kalamas River -NW Greece). Water Resour Manag 26:1677–1692

    Google Scholar 

  24. Kitheka JU (2002) Freshwater and sediment discharge in Ungwana Bay: The role of the Tana and Sabaki rivers. In: KMFRI (ed) Current status of trawl fishery of Malindi-Ungwana Bay. Kenya Marine Fisheries and Research Istitute, Mombasa, pp 2–16

    Google Scholar 

  25. Kristensen P (2004) The DPSIR framework. UNEP, Nairobi, 10 p

    Google Scholar 

  26. Lan TD, Olsson EA, Alpokay S (2014) Environmental stresses and resource use in coastal urban and Peri-Urban regions DPSIR approach to SECOA’s 17 case studies. Sapienza Università Editrice, Rome, 430 p

    Google Scholar 

  27. Lewison RL, Rudd MA, Al-Hayek W, Baldwin C, Beger M, Lieske SN, Jones C, Satumanatpan S, Junchompoo C, Hines E (2016) How the DPSIR framework can be used for structuring problems and facilitating empirical research in coastal systems. Environ Sci Policy 56:110–119

    Google Scholar 

  28. Mangi SC, Roberts CM, Rodwell LD (2007) Reef fisheries management in Kenya: Preliminary approach using the driverpressure- state-impacts-response (DPSIR) scheme of indicators. Ocean Coast Manage 50:463–480

    Google Scholar 

  29. Mattas C, Voudouris KS, Panagopoulos A (2014) Integrated groundwater resources management using the DPSIR approach in a GIS environment: A case study from the Gallikos River Basin, North Greece. Water 6:1043–1068

    Google Scholar 

  30. McClanahan TR, Muthiga NA, Kamukuru AT, Machano H, Kiambo RW (1999) The effects of marine parks and fishing on coral reefs of northern Tanzania. Biol Conserv 89:161–182

    Google Scholar 

  31. Mimidis K, Andrikakou P, Kallioras A, Pliakas F (2017) The DPSIR approach to groundwater management for sustainable development in coastal areas: The case of Nea Peramos aquifer system, Kavala, Greece. Water Util J 16:67–80

    Google Scholar 

  32. Munga C, Mohamed M, Amiyo N, Guebas F, Obura D, Vanreuse A (2012a) Status of coral reef fish communities within the Mombasa marine protected Area, Kenya, more than a decade after establishment. WIO J Mar Sci 2:169–184

    Google Scholar 

  33. Munga C, Ndegwa S, Fulanda B, Manyala J, Kimani E, Ohtomi J, Vanreusel A (2012b) Bottom shrimp trawling impacts on species distribution and fishery dynamics; Ungwana Bay fishery Kenya before and after the 2006 Trawl Ban. Fisheries Sci 78:209–219

    Google Scholar 

  34. Munga CN, Mwangi S, Ong’anda H, Ruwa R, Manyala J, Groeneveld JC, Kimani E, Vanreusel A (2013) Species composition, distribution patterns and population structure of penaeid shrimps in Malindi-Ungwana Bay, Kenya, based on experimental bottom trawl surveys. Fish Res 147:93–102

    Google Scholar 

  35. Munga CN, Mwangi S, Ong’anda H, Ruwa R, Manyala J, Groeneveld JC, Kimani E, Vanreusel A (2014a) Fish catch composition of artisanal and bottom trawl fisheries in Malindi-Ungwana Bay, Kenya: A cause for conflict? WIO J Mar Sci 13:177–188

    Google Scholar 

  36. Munga CN, Omukoto JO, Kimani EN, Vanreusel A (2014b) Propulsiongear- based characterisation of artisanal fisheries in the Malindi- Ungwana Bay, Kenya and its use for fisheries management. Ocean Coast Manage 98:130–139

    Google Scholar 

  37. Munga CN, Okemwa GM, Kimani EN, Wambiji N, Aura CM, Maina GW, Manyala JO (2015) Stock assessment of small and medium pelagics: Status of ring net and reef seine fisheries along the Kenyan coast. Kenya Marine & Fisheries Research Institute, Mombasa, 42 p

    Google Scholar 

  38. Obura D (2001) Kenya. Mar Pollut Bull 42:1264–1278

    Google Scholar 

  39. Oduor BW (1984) Status of fish catches and landings in Kenya. In: Iversen S, Myklevoll S (eds) The proceedings of the NORAD-Kenya seminar to review the marine fish stocks and fisheries in Kenya, Mombasa, 13–15 March 1984, p 9

    Google Scholar 

  40. Oesterwind D, Rau A, Zaiko A (2016) Drivers and pressures- Untangling the terms commonly used in marine science and policy. J Environ Manage 181:8–15

    Google Scholar 

  41. Ojeda-Martínez C, Casalduero FG, Bayle-Sempere JT, Cebrián CB, Valle C, Sanchez-Lizaso JL, Falcón M (2008) A conceptual framework for the integral management of marine protected areas. Ocean Coast Manage 52:89–101

    Google Scholar 

  42. Okemwa G, Arara BK, Kimani EN, Ogutu B, Ong’anda H, Obota C, Ontomwa M (2015) Gear-based species selectivity and potential interactions between artisanal and aquarium fisheries in coastal Kenya: Implications for reef fisheries management. WIO J Mar Sci 14:39–51

    Google Scholar 

  43. Osuka K, Samoilys M, Mbugua J, Leeuw J, Obura D (2016) Marine habitats of the Lamu-Kiunga coast: an assessment of biodiversity value, threats and opportunities. ICRAF, Nairobi, 59 p

    Google Scholar 

  44. Patrício J, Elliott M, Mazik K, Papadopoulou K, Smith CJ (2016) DPSIR—Two decades of trying to develop a unifying framework for marine environmental management? Frontiers Mar Sci 14:177. doi:https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2016.00177

    Google Scholar 

  45. Ruwa R (2006) Coastal and offshore marine fisheries of Kenya: Status and opportunities. Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute, Mombasa, 44 p

    Google Scholar 

  46. Samoilys MA, Osuka K, Maina G, Obura D (2017) Artisanal fisheries on Kenya’s coral reefs: Decadal trends reveal management needs. Fish Res 186:177–191

    Google Scholar 

  47. Stavros S, Fani S, Stergios T, Ioannis S, Olga C (2016) The environmental pressures and perspectives of tourism on coastal and insular zone. The Case of Greece. Nat Env Poll Tech 15:1009–1020

    Google Scholar 

  48. Svarstad H, Petersen LK, Rothman D, Siepel H, Watzold F (2008) Discursive biases of the environmental research framework DPSIR. Land Use Policy 25:116–125

    Google Scholar 

  49. USAID (2013) Ecosystems improved for sustainable fisheries: Framework for the state of the arine resource report. United States Agency for International Development, Manila, 123 p

    Google Scholar 

  50. Vannevel R (2018) Using DPSIR and balances to support water governance. Water 10:118. doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/w10020118

    Google Scholar 

  51. Wangai PW, Burkhard B, Kruse M, Müller F (2017) Contributing to the cultural ecosystem services and human wellbeing debate: A case study application on indicators and linkages. Landscape 50:1–27

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Acknowledgements

This work is part of the PhD study by Mumini Dzoga who was awarded a scholarship by the National Research Foundation (NRF) of South Africa. We are sincerely grateful for this opportunity. We are equally grateful to the National Research Funds of Kenya for research grants awarded to support this study. We are indebted to the support given.

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Mumini Dzoga.

Additional information

Publisher’s Note Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Dzoga, M., Simatele, D.M., Munga, C. et al. Application of the DPSIR Framework to Coastal and Marine Fisheries Management in Kenya. Ocean Sci. J. 55, 193–201 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12601-020-0013-y

Download citation

Keywords

  • DPSIR framework
  • coastal and marine fisheries
  • management framework
  • Kenya