Journal of Earth Science

, Volume 29, Issue 1, pp 169–181 | Cite as

Quantitative Analysis of Faults in Huizhou Sub-basin, Pearl River Mouth Basin

Structural Geology and Active Tectonics

Abstract

This study used 2D seismic profiles to investigate the Cenozoic evolution of faults in the Huizhou Sub-basin. It aims to define the basin structure style through describing the geometric features of the faults and quantitatively analyzing their activities. The results indicate that the boundary faults in the Huizhou Sub-basin display en echelon arrangement in plan view, which indicates that, it was caused by a kind of oblique extension. Calculating the fault slips shows long-term activities of faults occurred in the basin, and some boundary faults kept active after 5.5 Ma. The evolution history of the fault system is reconstructed. Initially, during the Eocene–Early Oligocene, mainly NNE-NE and NW trending faults and NE striking grabens and half-grabens formed in the basin and a series of faults system controlled the deposition. During the Late Oligocene–Early Miocene, the structural activities were relatively weak, the fault activity and the fault growth rate decreased sharply. Finally, in the late stage from Late Miocene to the present, the structure movement was re-activated, and some faults were also reactivated. Our study will help better understand the structural features and evolution of the petroleum-bearing basins in the northern margin of the South China Sea.

Key words

Pearl River Mouth Basin Huizhou Sub-basin fault activity fault growth rate 

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Notes

Acknowledgments

This paper was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 41272121, 91028009, 41102071) and the Program of Introducing Talents of Discipline to Universities (No. B14031). The data used are offered by CNOOC, Beijing. The final publication is available at Springer via https://doi.org/10.1007/s12583-018-0823-3.

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Copyright information

© China University of Geosciences and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Tectonics and Petroleum Resources of Ministry of EducationChina University of GeosciencesWuhanChina
  2. 2.School of Economic and ManagementChina University of GeosciencesWuhanChina

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