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The Journal of Physiological Sciences

, Volume 67, Issue 3, pp 425–430 | Cite as

Canola oil rich in oleic acid improves diastolic heart function in diet-induced obese rats

  • Sijo Joseph Thandapilly
  • Pema Raj
  • Xavier Lieben Louis
  • Danielle Perera
  • Prasanga Yamanagedara
  • Peter Zahradka
  • Carla G. Taylor
  • Thomas Netticadan
Short Communication

Abstract

Obesity is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease. It directly affects heart structure and function and contributes to heart failure. Diet is a major factor involved in the development of obesity along with genetic factors. We examined the effects of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acid-rich oils on cardiac structure and function in the diet-induced rodent model of obesity (DIO). Obese prone (OP) rats were fed a high-fat diet (HF; 55% of kcal) for 12 weeks; Sprague–Dawley rats fed commercial chow served as control. Echocardiography was performed to assess the cardiac structure and function in all rats at 12 weeks. OP rats fed the HF diet showed significant impairment in diastolic function compared to control rats. The HF diet containing high oleic canola oil significantly improved diastolic function of OP rats compared to the HF diet with lard. In conclusion, canola oil rich in oleic acid, when incorporated into an HF diet, prevents the development of diastolic dysfunction in DIO rats.

Keywords

Diet-induced obesity Edible oil Diastolic dysfunction 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The infrastructural support was generously provided by the St. Boniface Hospital Research Foundation. We would also like to thank the staff of the R.O. Burrell Animal Facility at St. Boniface Research Centre for their help with animal care.

Compliance with ethical standards

Funding

Canola Products Research Fund, Canola/Flax Agri-Science Cluster and Canada-Manitoba (CT, PZ) and Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (TN).

Conflict of interest

The authors report no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

The experimental protocols were approved by the University of Manitoba Animal Care Committee and are in agreement with the Canadian Council on Animal Care and Use of Experimental Animals.

Informed consent

This article does not contain any studies with human participants performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© The Physiological Society of Japan and Springer Japan 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sijo Joseph Thandapilly
    • 1
    • 2
  • Pema Raj
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Xavier Lieben Louis
    • 1
  • Danielle Perera
    • 3
  • Prasanga Yamanagedara
    • 3
  • Peter Zahradka
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Carla G. Taylor
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • Thomas Netticadan
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Human Nutritional SciencesUniversity of ManitobaWinnipegCanada
  2. 2.Agriculture and Agri-Food CanadaWinnipegCanada
  3. 3.Canadian Centre for Agri-Food Research in Health and MedicineWinnipegCanada
  4. 4.Department of Physiology and PathophysiologyUniversity of ManitobaWinnipegCanada
  5. 5.St. Boniface Albrechtsen Research CentreWinnipegCanada

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