Delayed Model Matching of Asynchronous Sequential Machines With Discrepancy in the Initial State

Abstract

Model matching for asynchronous sequential machines (ASMs) is to design a corrective controller so as to match the stable-state behavior of the closed-loop system to that of a reference model. In this paper, we discuss the model matching problem for ASMs with discrepancy in the initial state. Owing to a lot of practical constraints, the controlled ASM may not commence its operation at the same initial state as the model, leading to initial model mismatch. We investigate under which condition an appropriate corrective controller can be designed that solves initial model mismatch. If such a condition is not valid, we address delayed model matching in which the closed-loop system is controlled to be stably equivalent with the model within an allowable delay-bound from the initial operation. FPGA experiments on an asynchronous error counter are provided to show the applicability of the proposed control scheme.

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Correspondence to Dong-Eun Lee or Seong Woo Kwak.

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Recommended by Associate Editor Shun-ichi Azuma under the direction of Editor Fumitoshi Matsuno. This research was supported in part by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MSIT) (no. NRF-2018R1A5A1025137), in part by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (no. NRF-2018R1D1A1A09082016), and in part by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (no. NRF-2016R1D1A1B02012959).

Jung-Min Yang received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Korea, in 1993, 1995, and 1999, respectively. Since 2013, he has been with the School of Electronics Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea, where he is currently a professor. His research interests are in control of asynchronous sequential machines, supervisory control of discrete-event systems, and control of complex networks.

Dong-Eun Lee worked for the School of Engineering at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville (SIUE) in USA as an assistant professor. He is now a full professor with tenure in both the School of Architecture and Civil Engineering and the Robot and Smart System Engineering at Kyungpook National University, Korea. He is also the chief of Intelligent Construction Automation Center nominated by Ministry of Science and ICT. His specialty includes automation in construction, construction robots, optimization, stochastic simulation, and quantitative analysis.

Seong Woo Kwak received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Korea, in 1993, 1995, and 2000, respectively. Since 2020, he has been with the Department of Control and Instrumentation Engineering, Pukyong National University, Busan, Korea, where he is currently a professor. His research interests are in fault tolerant systems, control of asynchronous sequential machines, and space-borne electronics.

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Yang, JM., Lee, DE. & Kwak, S.W. Delayed Model Matching of Asynchronous Sequential Machines With Discrepancy in the Initial State. Int. J. Control Autom. Syst. (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12555-020-0226-y

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Keywords

  • Asynchronous sequential machines (ASMs)
  • corrective control
  • delayed model matching
  • difference in the initial state