World Journal of Pediatrics

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 106–111 | Cite as

Childhood absence epilepsy and benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes: a narrative review analysis

  • Alberto Verrotti
  • Renato D’Alonzo
  • Victoria Elisa Rinaldi
  • Sara Casciato
  • Alfredo D’Aniello
  • Giancarlo Di Gennaro
Review Article

Abstract

Background

Recent studies have shown a possible coexistence of absence seizures with other forms of epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to ascertain the possible contemporary or subsequent presence of childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes (BECTS) in pediatric epileptic patients.

Data sources

A PubMed systematic search indexed for MEDLINE, PubMed and EMBASE was undertaken to identify studies in children including articles written between 1996 and 2015. Retrospective studies, meta-analysis and case reports were included. The list of references of all the relevant articles was also studied. The date of our last search was December 2015.

Results

Review of the literature revealed 19 cases, 8 females and 11 males, reporting a consecutive or contemporary coexistence of CAE and BECTS within the same patients. Patient’s age ranged between 4 and 12 years. Three out of 19 patients presented concomitant features of both syndromes, whereas 16 patients experienced the two syndromes at different times.

Conclusions

BECTS and CAE may be pathophysiologically related, and the two epileptic phenotypes may indicate a neurobiological continuum. Further studies are needed to elucidate a probable genetic or functional link between partial and primarily generalized electro-clinical patterns in idiopathic childhood epilepsies.

Key words

absence seizures benign epilepsy with centro-temporal spikes childhood abscence epilepsy 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank Federico Mecarini for his valuable contribution in the research for this paper.

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Copyright information

© Children's Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alberto Verrotti
    • 1
  • Renato D’Alonzo
    • 2
  • Victoria Elisa Rinaldi
    • 2
  • Sara Casciato
    • 3
  • Alfredo D’Aniello
    • 4
  • Giancarlo Di Gennaro
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Pediatrics, Ospedale S. Salvatore, L’Aquila University School of MedicineUniversity of L’AquilaL’AquilaItaly
  2. 2.Department of PaediatricsUniversity of PerugiaPerugiaItaly
  3. 3.Department of Neurology and PsychiatryUniversity of Rome, “La Sapienza”RomeItaly
  4. 4.IRCCS NEUROMEDPozzilli (IS)Italy

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