Development of SOA-based WebGIS framework for education sector

Abstract

The applications of Geographic Information System (GIS) in the education sector are increasing day by day. The geospatial information can be published, discovered, searched, analyzed, and displayed through webGIS-based applications. Lack of an open source geospatial resource-based platform for data sharing, discovery, and service delivery in the education sector is a critical issue in managing the education of large population in India. The use of open geospatial consortium (OGC) developed open standards for geospatial web services will result in the interoperability of geographic information. In this paper, an interoperable and secure service-oriented architecture (SOA)-based webGIS framework is developed to handle the technical and non-technical issues in the education sector. In this research work, spatial analysis on schools is performed along with the design and development of webGIS framework using SOA, OGC standards, and open source software. The developed webGIS framework, acronym as EduGIS, is interoperable and secure which is implemented for the education sector. The development of webGIS framework is based upon three-tier thin client architecture. The present research work has investigated an optimized adoption of various free and open source software like Quantum GIS, GeoServer, Apache Tomcat, PostGIS, and uDig in different tiers of developed webGIS framework. The interoperability of developed EduGIS ensures that it can be shared across different technologies, data, platforms, and organizations. The development of open source-based webGIS framework will serve as a means of reducing licensing costs in developing countries like India and will promote indigenous technological development for primary education in rural areas.

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Acknowledgments

The authors would like to extend their sincere thanks to Mr. Dharmendera Kumar Meena for his field assistance in capturing the location of schools using handheld GPS, which is used in this study.

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Correspondence to Sonam Agrawal.

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Agrawal, S., Gupta, R.D. Development of SOA-based WebGIS framework for education sector. Arab J Geosci 13, 563 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12517-020-05490-9

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Keywords

  • WebGIS
  • OGC
  • SOA
  • Education
  • School
  • Open source
  • Thiessen polygon