Contemporary Jewry

, Volume 38, Issue 1, pp 5–20 | Cite as

The Process of the Universalization of Holocaust Education: Problems and Challenges

Article
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Abstract

This article discusses the process of the universalization of Holocaust education and sets its conceptual and educational framework, highlighting its pedagogical challenges and hazards. It explores the phenomenon of the universalization of Holocaust education as a means to combat racism and to analyze how a particularistic educational issue has become the subject of global, universalistic concern. Through reviewing current literature, it argues that the complexity of this approach needs to be considered, particularly with the increasing violence and xenophobia in the world. Drawing on the paradigm of the Holocaust, this universal approach to anti-racist education to promote peace and harmony globally within civil society has been promoted as a way of countering prejudice. However, there are pitfalls to seeking universal lessons from a particularistic event. These challenges can be addressed to advance anti-racist education using the Holocaust as a case study and thus developing a reflective culture of remembrance.

Keywords

Holocaust education Universalism Particularism Anti-racist education Remembrance Reflective culture of remembrance 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was sponsored by the Sal Van Gelder Center for Holocaust Instruction and Research, School of Education, Bar Ilan University, Israel.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Churgin School of EducationBar-Ilan UniversityRamat GanIsrael

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