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School Mental Health

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 275–286 | Cite as

Psychometric Properties of the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale with Adolescents in Japanese High Schools

  • Shin-ichi Ishikawa
  • Yayoi Takeno
  • Yoko Sato
  • Kohei Kishida
  • Yuto Yatagai
  • Susan H. Spence
Original Paper

Abstract

This study investigated anxiety symptoms of Japanese adolescents in community high schools. Japanese high school students (N = 1500) from diverse types of schools including general, vocational, and part-time schools completed the Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale (SCAS). First, confirmatory factor analysis supported the 6-factor structure with strong goodness-of-fit indices comparable with the original studies as well as those with Japanese elementary and junior high school students. Girls showed more anxiety symptoms, and items related to worry, insects/spiders phobia, checking, and fear of negative evaluations were the most common symptoms, similar to younger youth. Finally, students who attended part-time high school reported higher anxiety symptoms than those in full-time schools. The utility of the SCAS for assessment of anxiety symptoms in high school students and the need for preventive interventions for students at risk for developing anxiety were discussed.

Keywords

Anxiety Adolescents High school Japan Spence Children’s Anxiety Scale 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

All authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional research committee (Doshisha University # 17002) and with the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of PsychologyDoshisha UniversityKyotanabe CityJapan
  2. 2.Nichinan Shintoku High SchoolNichinanJapan
  3. 3.Faculty of EducationUniversity of MiyazakiMiyazakiJapan
  4. 4.Graduate School of PsychologyDoshisha UniversityKyotanabe CityJapan
  5. 5.Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of ScienceTokyoJapan
  6. 6.Australian Institute for Suicide Research and PreventionGriffith UniversityMount GravattAustralia

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