Hybrid Nature: Effects on Environmental Fundamentals and Species’ Semiosis

Abstract

In hybrid nature that results from a random mix of technological infrastructures and natural ecosystems, environmental fundamentals (spatial patterns and resources, complexity, uncertainty, information, and meaning) are modified producing dramatic effects on the semiosis of several species. Human intrusion in ecosystems creates new spatial configurations that have a reduced ecological complexity when compared with systems less affected by human manipulation. This causes cascading effects on other environmental fundamentals. F.i., systems that face a low complexity, are more exposed to changes that in turn can reduce the performances of individual species due to a higher level of uncertainty. The flux of information could be apparently maintained in hybrid nature when some natural patterns and processes are replaced by human artifacts and associated dynamics, but the process of signification (meaning) could be strongly modified. The strict contact between people and wild organisms in hybrid nature requires new types of strategies to guarantee the continuation of the natural dynamic of populations and communities. Rural sanctuaries are proposed as one of the possible models on which to invest in order to harmonize the technological and natural processes with the goal to assure a multiscale sustainability.

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Farina, A. Hybrid Nature: Effects on Environmental Fundamentals and Species’ Semiosis. Biosemiotics 13, 21–40 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12304-019-09373-9

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Keywords

  • Hybrid nature
  • Semiosis
  • Complexity
  • Uncertainty