Tracer gas is a suitable surrogate of exhaled droplet nuclei for studying airborne transmission in the built environment

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Acknowledgements

This study was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51908203).

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Correspondence to Zhengtao Ai.

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Zhengtao Ai is a full professor of building thermal environment at Hunan University. His area of expertise includes CFD simulation of flow and dispersion in coupled indoor and outdoor environment and climate chamber test of spread of human exhaled droplet nuclei indoors.

Cheuk Ming Mak is a full professor of building environment at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. His area of expertise covers building physics and urban physics. He has been for over 25 years focusing on CFD simulation of natural ventilation and related dispersion process in buildings.

Naiping Gao is a full professor of thermal engineering and environment at Tongji University. His area of expertise covers building ventilation and indoor air quality, especially including CFD simulation of human microenvironment, human exposure, and particle dispersion and deposition in indoor environments.

Jianlei Niu is a chair professor of building environment and energy at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. His research interests are indoor air quality, thermal comfort and relevant energy-efficient solutions. He is one of the first researchers who investigate into the spread of SARS viruses in the built environment using field measurements, wind tunnel experiments and CFD simulations.

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Ai, Z., Mak, C.M., Gao, N. et al. Tracer gas is a suitable surrogate of exhaled droplet nuclei for studying airborne transmission in the built environment. Build. Simul. 13, 489–496 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12273-020-0614-5

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