Advertisement

Building Simulation

, Volume 12, Issue 5, pp 835–846 | Cite as

Parameter study of sound energy distribution in cuboid extra-large spaces

  • Chao Wang
  • Hui Ma
  • Jian KangEmail author
Open Access
Research Article Building Thermal, Lighting, and Acoustics Modeling

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to explore the sound energy distribution in cuboid extra-large spaces. The surface absorption and height are studied as the parameters using the image method. Air absorption is also discussed in this paper. The results show that the difficulty of reducing the noise increases with the increasing volume in extra-large spaces. Even if the ratio between the equivalent absorption area and the total surface is kept constant, the efficiency of noise reduction decreases by approximately 21% in this study. The absorption areas on the floor and the walls have a better performance on noise reduction than that on the ceiling. When the initial height of an extra-large space with general ratio of three dimensions is continuously halved, the variation in the noise level is close to a fixed value, and when the initial height continuously doubled, the noise level decreased approximately exponentially. The predicted difference between with and without consideration of air absorption increases linearly with the source-receiver distance.

Keywords

extra-large space energy distribution image method parameter study sound absorption 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant numbers 51378139 and 51478303. We also acknowledge Python Software Foundation and Continuum Analytics for their open-source software Python and Anaconda.

References

  1. Anderson JS, Bratos-Anderson M (2000). Acoustic coupling effects in St Paul’s Cathedral, London. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 236: 209–225.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Anderson JS, Bratos-Anderson M, Doany P (1997). The acoustics of a large space with a repetitive pattern of coupled rooms. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 208: 313–329.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Aretz M, Orlowski R (2009). Sound strength and reverberation time in small concert halls. Applied Acoustics, 70: 1099–1110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Barron M (2013). Objective assessment of concert hall acoustics using Temporal Energy Analysis. Applied Acoustics, 74: 936–944.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Barron M, Lee LJ (1988). Energy relations in concert auditoriums. I. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 84: 618–628.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Beranek LL (2016). Concert hall acoustics: Recent findings. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 139: 1548–1556.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Bistafa SR, Bradley JS (2000). Predicting reverberation times in a simulated classroom. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 108: 1721–1731.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Bolt RH, Doak PE, Westervelt PJ (1950). Pulse statistics analysis of room acoustics. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 22: 328–340.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Cai M, Lan Z, Zhang Z, Wang H (2019). Evaluation of road traffic noise exposure based on high-resolution population distribution and grid-level noise data. Building and Environment, 147: 211–220.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Cirillo E, Martellotta F (2003). An improved model to predict energy-based acoustic parameters in Apulian-Romanesque churches. Applied Acoustics, 64: 1–23.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Cirillo E, Martellotta F (2005). Sound propagation and energy relations in churches. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 118: 232–248.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Dance SM, Shield BM (1997). The complete image-source method for the prediction of sound distribution in non-diffuse enclosed spaces. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 201: 473–489.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Doak P (1959). Fluctuations of the sound pressure level in rooms when the receiver position is varied. Acta Acustica united with Acustica, 9: 1–9.Google Scholar
  14. Egan MD (1988). Architectural Acoustics. New York: McGraw-Hill Custom Publishing.Google Scholar
  15. Galaitsis AG, Patterson WN (1976). Prediction of noise distribution in various enclosures from free-field measurements. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 60: 848–856.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Gibbs BM, Jones D (1972). A simple image method for calculating the distribution of sound pressure levels within an enclosure. Acta Acustica united with Acustica, 26: 24–32.Google Scholar
  17. Girón S, Álvarez-Morales L, Zamarreño T (2017). Church acoustics: A state-of-the-art review after several decades of research. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 411: 378–408.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Hodgson M (1988). On the prediction of sound fields in large empty rooms. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 84: 253–261.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Hodgson M (1990). Evidence of diffuse surface reflection in rooms. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 88(S1): S185–S185.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Hodgson M (1994). When is diffuse-field theory accurate? Canadian Acoustics, 22: 41–42.Google Scholar
  21. Hodgson M (1996). When is diffuse-field theory applicable? Applied Acoustics, 49: 197–207.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Hou Q, Cai M, Wang H (2017). Dynamic modeling of traffic noise in both indoor and outdoor environments by using a ray tracing method. Building and Environment, 121: 225–237.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Kang J (1996a). Acoustics in long enclosures with multiple sources. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 99: 985–989.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Kang J (1996b). The unsuitability of the classic room acoustical theory in long enclosures. Architectural Science Review, 39: 89–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Kang J (2000). Sound propagation in street canyons: Comparison between diffusely and geometrically reflecting boundaries. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 107: 1394–1404.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Kang J (2001). Sound propagation in interconnected urban streets: A parametric study. Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, 28: 281–294.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Kang J (2002). Acoustics of Long Spaces: Theory and Design Guidance. London: Thomas Telford Publishing.Google Scholar
  28. Kryter KD (1962). Methods for the calculation and use of the articulation index. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 34: 1689–1697.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Kuttruff H (2009). Room Acoustics, 5th edn. New York: Spon Press.Google Scholar
  30. Lehmann EA, Johansson AM (2008). Prediction of energy decay in room impulse responses simulated with an image-source model. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 124: 269–277.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Lewers TH, Anderson JS (1984). Some acoustical properties of St Paul’s Cathedral, London. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 92: 285–297.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Picaut J, Simon L, Polack JD (1999). Sound field in long rooms with diffusely reflecting boundaries. Applied Acoustics, 56: 217–240.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Summers JE, Torres RR, Shimizu Y (2004). Statistical-acoustics models of energy decay in systems of coupled rooms and their relation to geometrical acoustics. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 116: 958–969.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Visentin C, Prodi N, Valeau V, Picaut J (2015). Experimental analysis of the relationship between reverberant acoustic intensity and energy density inside long rooms. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 138: 181–192.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Wang C, Ma H, Wu Y, Kang J (2018). Characteristics and prediction of sound level in extra-large spaces. Applied Acoustics, 134: 1–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Xiang N, Goggans PM, Jasa T, Kleiner M (2005). Evaluation of decay times in coupled spaces: Reliability analysis of Bayeisan decay time estimation. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 117: 3707–3715.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Xiang N, Goggans P, Jasa T, Robinson P (2011). Bayesian characterization of multiple-slope sound energy decays in coupled-volume systems. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 129: 741–752.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made.

The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.

To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of ArchitectureTianjin UniversityTianjinChina
  2. 2.UCL Institute for Environmental Design and Engineering, The BartlettUniversity College London (UCL), Central HouseLondonUK

Personalised recommendations