Improved control of the pressure in a cleanroom environment

Abstract

In order to protect cleanrooms from contamination from adjacent less clean spaces, the cleanroom must be built air tight and maintain an (over) pressure of sufficient magnitude and deviation. For this magnitude there are guidelines. However, there is a lack of guidelines for the required deviation of the pressure. As a result, an unstable pressure could result in an undefined air direction and increase the risk of contamination. This unstable pressure occurs especially during entering the cleanroom with an air tight cleanroom. In this paper the pressure and the entrance of the cleanroom are modeled in the SimuLink modeling environment. The model is verified and validated. The main problem addressed here is that the air tightness and the deviation of the pressure are in conflict with each other. It is concluded that the new proposed adjustment decreases the deviation of the pressure in the cleanroom and enhances the precision of control.

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Correspondence to A. W. M. van Schijndel.

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van den Brink, A.H.T.M., van Schijndel, A.W.M. Improved control of the pressure in a cleanroom environment. Build. Simul. 5, 61–72 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12273-012-0065-8

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Keywords

  • cleanroom
  • pressure
  • deviation
  • simulation
  • SimuLink