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American Journal of Potato Research

, Volume 95, Issue 5, pp 597–605 | Cite as

TerraRossa: A Mid-Season Specialty Potato with Red Flesh and Skin and Resistance to Common Scab and Golden Cyst Nematode

  • C. C. ShockEmail author
  • C. R. Brown
  • V. Sathuvalli
  • B. A. Charlton
  • S. Yilma
  • D. C. Hane
  • R. Quick
  • K. A. Rykbost
  • S. R. James
  • A. R. Mosley
  • E. B. G. Feibert
  • J. L. Whitworth
  • R. G. Novy
  • J. C. Stark
  • M. J. Pavek
  • N. R. Knowles
  • D. A. Navarre
  • J. C. MillerJr
  • D. G. Holm
  • S. S. Jayanty
  • J. Debons
  • M. I. Vales
  • X. Wang
  • L. L. Hamlin
Article
  • 144 Downloads

Abstract

TerraRossa (POR01PG20–12) is a mid-season specialty potato, released by Oregon State University, and is a product of the Northwest Potato Variety (Tri-State) Development Program. This cultivar is unique among commercially available potato cultivars in that plants produce small- to medium-sized smooth, oblong- to long-shaped tubers with red skin and red flesh. Total tuber yields of TerraRossa are similar to Dark Red Norland and less than Red La Soda. Average tuber size (136 g) is less than both of the comparison cultivars, reflecting inherent differences in tuber size distribution. TerraRossa tubers have total antioxidant levels higher than traditional white fresh varieties and comparable to the All Blue purple potato, known for its high antioxidant levels. Sensory evaluations of TerraRossa tubers indicated that it has good culinary attributes following boiling, baking, and microwaving. Potato chips made from TerraRossa tubers retained their unique red color, which represents a novelty in the chipping industry. TerraRossa could be a good candidate for the organic sector due to its tolerance to common scab (Streptomyces scabies) and tuber late blight (Phytophthora infestans) and its resistance to golden cyst nematode (Globodera rostochiensis). Due to its high yields, high chipping quality, good culinary properties, high antioxidant content and disease resistance, TerraRossa is a good candidate for opening new specialty type markets, adding diversity to the marketplace.

Keywords

Solanum tuberosum Variety Cultivar Breeding Antioxidants 

Resumen

TerraRossa (POR01PG20–12) es una papa de especialidad de ciclo intermedio, liberada por la Universidad del Estado de Oregon, y es un producto del Programa de Desarrollo de Variedades de Papa Noroccidental (Tri-State). Esta variedad es única entre las variedades de papa disponibles comercialmente, en el sentido de que las plantas producen tubérculos de tamaño pequeño a mediano, suaves, de formas oblongas a alargadas, de piel y pulpa rojas. Los rendimientos totales de tubérculo de TerraRossa son similares a Dark Red Norland y menores a los de Red La Soda. El tamaño promedio del tubérculo (136 g) es menor al de ambas variedades de comparación, reflejando diferencias inherentes a la distribución del tamaño de tubérculo. Los tubérculos de TerraRossa tienen niveles totales de antioxidantes más altos que las variedades tradicionales de pulpa blanca y comparables a la papa morada All Blue, conocida por sus altos niveles de antioxidantes. Las evaluaciones sensoriales de los tubérculos de TerraRossa indicaron que tiene buenos atributos culinarios después de hervidas, cocinadas y pasadas por el horno de microondas. Las hojuelas de papa hechas de los tubérculos de TerraRossa retienen su color rojo único, que representa una novedad en la industria del freído. TerraRossa pudiera ser una buena candidata para el sector orgánico debido a su tolerancia a la roña común (Streptomyces scabies), al tizón tardío de tubérculo (Phytophthora infestans) y su resistencia al nematodo dorado de quiste (Globodera rostochiensis). Debido a sus altos rendimientos, alta calidad de freído, buenas propiedades culinarias, alto contenido de antioxidantes y resistencia a enfermedades, TerraRossa es una buena candidata para abrir nuevos mercados del tipo de especialidades, agregando diversidad al ámbito del mercado.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors thank Margaret Bain, Darrin Culp, Lorie Ewing, and Brian Schneider, as well as our cooperators in the Western Regional Potato Variety Trials. The authors further extend their thanks to Drs. Rob Davidson and Walter De Jong for help with disease data. The contributions from the Oregon, Washington and Idaho Potato Commissions to the development and release of TerraRossa are greatly appreciated. The development of TerraRossa was partially funded by the USDA NIFA Special Grant for Potato Breeding.

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Copyright information

© The Potato Association of America 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. C. Shock
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • C. R. Brown
    • 3
  • V. Sathuvalli
    • 2
    • 4
  • B. A. Charlton
    • 5
  • S. Yilma
    • 2
  • D. C. Hane
    • 4
  • R. Quick
    • 3
  • K. A. Rykbost
    • 5
  • S. R. James
    • 2
  • A. R. Mosley
    • 2
  • E. B. G. Feibert
    • 1
  • J. L. Whitworth
    • 6
  • R. G. Novy
    • 6
  • J. C. Stark
    • 7
  • M. J. Pavek
    • 8
  • N. R. Knowles
    • 8
  • D. A. Navarre
    • 3
  • J. C. MillerJr
    • 9
  • D. G. Holm
    • 10
  • S. S. Jayanty
    • 10
  • J. Debons
    • 11
  • M. I. Vales
    • 2
    • 9
  • X. Wang
    • 12
  • L. L. Hamlin
    • 13
  1. 1.Malheur Experiment StationOregon State UniversityOntarioUSA
  2. 2.Department of Crop and Soil SciencesOregon State UniversityCorvallisUSA
  3. 3.USDA-ARSProsserUSA
  4. 4.Hermiston Agricultural R&E CenterOregon State UniversityHermistonUSA
  5. 5.Klamath Basin R&E CenterOregon State UniversityKlamath FallsUSA
  6. 6.USDA-ARS, Aberdeen R&E CenterAberdeenUSA
  7. 7.Idaho Falls R&E CenterUniversity of IdahoIdaho FallsUSA
  8. 8.Department of HorticultureWashington State UniversityPullmanUSA
  9. 9.Department of Horticultural SciencesTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  10. 10.San Luis Valley Research CenterColorado State UniversityCenterUSA
  11. 11.PVMIBendUSA
  12. 12.Emerging Pests and Pathogens Research Unit, Robert W. Holley Center for Agriculture and Health, USDA/ARSIthacaUSA
  13. 13.Irrigated Agriculture Research and Extension CenterWashington State UniversityProsserUSA

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