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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Assessing Response Style and Malingering

  • Steve Rubenzer
Article

Abstract

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may form the basis for disability or worker’s compensation claims or a personal injury lawsuit. While now achieving widespread acceptance among treating professionals and the public, PTSD is the subject of several controversies and the possibility of faking in a compensation context. There appears to be a dramatic split among mental health professionals who write primarily from a treatment or plaintiff perspective and those who take a more skeptical approach. This article reviews recent developments in the assessment of malingering, including symptom validity measures, and applies them to the assessment of PTSD. Recommendations for current practice are provided.

Keywords

Posttraumatic stress disorder, PTSD Malingering Faking Exaggeration Symptom validity testing, SVT 

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  1. 1.HoustonUSA

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