KSCE Journal of Civil Engineering

, Volume 22, Issue 2, pp 823–836 | Cite as

A coordinated signal priority strategy for modern trams on arterial streets by predicting the tram dwell time

Transportation Engineering
  • 33 Downloads

Abstract

The modern tram has been recognized as a popular and efficient mode of public transit, and the signal priority for trams, particularly coordination on arterial streets, is a crucial and feasible strategy for improving the operation efficiency and level of service of trams. Different from the traditional “green wave” method, the fluctuations in dwell time at stops should be considered, and sacrifices to the automobile right-of-way must be controlled. Accordingly, a Support Vector Machine (SVM) model was proposed to predict the dwell time of trams at stops, which determines tram arrival times at the stop line. A two- sequential programming model to determine signal timings, including offsets and reallocations of green time, was then established. The upper level programming aims to minimize the stop frequency of a tram at the coordination region, and then, the optimal solution becomes the new restriction of the lower programming, whose objective is to minimize the overall delay of automobiles. This strategy was evaluated using the microscopic simulation software VISSIM using Tongjiang Road in Changzhou as the study region. The findings demonstrate that this strategy can significantly reduce more tram travel delays and stop rates on arteries than the conventional Transit Signal Priority (CTSP), and it definitively outperforms and the Static Two-direction Green Wave (STGW) method in decreasing these indicators of automobiles driving along arteries. Moreover, the satisfactory decreases in delay and average queue length at each intersection reflect a remarkable reduction or even elimination of negative effects from tram signal priority (tram SP). Finally, the stability of the proposed strategy in promoting both tram and automobile travel efficiency was proven by traffic volume sensitivity tests. The results and findings are meaningful for traffic managers to enhance the operation efficiency and attractiveness of trams by flexible signal control strategies. In addition, the conflicts between automobiles and tram SP can be successfully solved.

Keywords

tram signal priority dwell time prediction arterial coordination sequential programming multi-scenario simulation 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Brenner, M. F. (2007). “LRT-and tramway priority in the course of “Green Waves” a planning method to integrate public transport into progressive signal systems.” Proceedings of the 14th World Congress on Intelligent Transport Systems, Beijng.Google Scholar
  2. Chang, J., Collura, J., Dion, F., and Rakha, H. (2003). “Evaluation of service reliability impacts of traffic signal priority strategies for bus transit.” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, Vol. 1841, pp. 23–31, DOI: 10.3141/1841-03.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Ding, J., Yang, M., Wang, W., and Xu C. C. (2015). “Strategy for multiobjective transit signal priority with prediction of bus dwell time at stops.” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, Vol. 2488, pp. 10–19, DOI: 10.3141/2488-02.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Dion, F. and Hellinga, B. (2002). “A rule-based real-time traffic responsive signal control system with transit priority: Application to an isolated intersection.” Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Vol. 36, No. 4, pp. 325–343, DOI: 10.1016/S0191-2615(01)00006-6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Dion, F., Rakha, H., and Zhang, Y. (2004). “Integration of transit signal priority within adaptive traffic signal control systems.” Transportation Research Board, Washington, D.C..Google Scholar
  6. Gatenby, M. and Fedzin, S. (2004). “Traffic signal nextwork operation within the nottingham express transity system.” Traffic Engineering & Control, Vol. 2, No. 45, pp. 44–49.Google Scholar
  7. Ghanim, M. S. and Abu-Lebdeh, G. (2015). “Real-time dynamic transit signal priority optimization for coordinated traffic networks using genetic algorithms and artificial neural networks.” Journal of Intelligent Transportation Systems, Vol. 19, No. 4, pp. 327–338, DOI: 10.1080/15472450.2014.936292.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. He, Q., Head, K. L., and Ding, J. (2011). “Heuristic algorithm for priority traffic signal control.” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, Vol. 2259, pp. 1–7, DOI: 10.3141/2259-01.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. He, Q. Head, K. L., and Ding, J. (2012). “PAMSCOD: Platoon-based arterial multi-modal signal control with online data.” Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, Vol. 20, No. 1, pp. 164–184, DOI: 10.1016/j.trc.2011.05.007.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. He, Q., Head, K. L., and Ding, J. (2014). “Multi-modal traffic signal control with priority, signal actuation and coordination.” Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, Vol. 45, pp. 65–82, DOI: 10.1016/j.trc.2014.05.001.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Hounsell, N. B. and Wu, J. (1995). “Public transport priority in real time traffic control systems.” Appl. Adv. Technol. Transp. Eng., pp. 71–75.Google Scholar
  12. Hu, J., Byungkyu, P., and Lee, Y. (2015). “Coordinated transit signal priority supporting transit progression under connected vehicle technology.” Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, Vol. 55, pp. 393–408, DOI: 10.1016/j.trc.2014.12.005.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Hu, J., Byungkyu, P., and Lee, Y. (2016). “Transit signal priority accommodating conflicting requests under Connected Vehicles Technology.” Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, Vol. 69, pp. 173–192, DOI: 10.1016/j.trc.2016.06.001.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Hu, J., Byungkyu, P., and Parkany, A. (2014). “Transit signal priority with connected vehicle technology.” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, Vol. 2418, pp. 20–29, DOI: 10.3141/2418-03.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Ji, Y. J., Deng, W., Wang, W., and Zhang, W. H. (2005). “Study on the design of signal phase based on bus priority intersections.” Journal of Highway and Transportation Research and Development, Vol. 21, No. 12, pp. 118–122.Google Scholar
  16. Kim, W. and Rilett, L. R. (2005). “Improved transit signal priority system for networks with nearside bus stops.” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No 1925, pp. 205–214, DOI: 10.3141/1925-21.Google Scholar
  17. Lee, J., Shalaby, A., Greenough, J., Bowie, M., and Hung, S. (2005). “Advanced transit signal priority control with online microsimulationbased transit prediction model.” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No 1925, pp. 185–194. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3141/1925-19.Google Scholar
  18. Li, F., Wang, D. H., and Yang, X. R. (2009). “Signal timing method for transit passive priority at an isolated intersection.” Computer and Communications, Vol. 3, No. 27, pp. 61–64, DOI: 10.3963/j.cn.42-1781.U.2009.03.013.Google Scholar
  19. Li, J., Wang, W., van Zuylen, H. J., Szw, N. N., Chen, X. W., and Wang, H. (2012). “Predictive strategy for transit signal priority at fixed-time signalized intersections.” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, Vol. 2311, pp. 124–131, DOI: 10.3141/2311-12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Li, M., Wu, G., Li, Y., and Zhang, W. B. (2007). “Active signal priority for light rail transit at grade crossings.” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, No. 2035, pp. 141–149, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3141/2035-16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Lin, Y., Yang, X., Zou, N., and Franz, M. (2015). “Transit signal priority control at signalized intersections: A comprehensive review.” Transportation Letters: The International Journal of Transportation Research, Vol. 7, No. 3, pp. 168–180, DOI: 10.1179/1942787514Y. 0000000044.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Liu, H., Skabardonis, A., and Zhang, W. (2003). “A dynamic model for adaptive bus signal priority.” Transportation Research Board, Washington, D.C..Google Scholar
  23. Ma, W. J., Head, K.L., and Feng Y. H. (2014). “Integrated optimization of transit priority operation at isolated intersections: A personcapacity-based approach.” Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, Vol. 40, pp. 49–62, DOI: 10.1016/j.trc.2013.12.011.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Ma, W. J., Xie, H. Z., Bai, Y., Zhao, J., and Yang, X. G. (2013). “Signal timing optimization model based on dual-ring phase scheme for roundabout.” Journal of Central South University, Vol. 20, No. 2, pp. 563–571, DOI: 10.1007/s11771-013-1519-6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Ma, W. J. and Yu B. (2008). “Serve sequence optimization approach for multiple bus priority requests based on decision tree.” Seventh International Conference of Chinese Transportation Professionals Congress, ICCTP, DOI: 10.1061/40952(317)59#sthash.Ucesmw7b.dpufGoogle Scholar
  26. Ma, W. J. and Yang, X. (2007). “A passive transit signal priority approach for bus rapid transit system.” Intelligent Transportation Systems Conference, IEEE, DOI: 10.1109/ITSC.2007.4357625.Google Scholar
  27. Righol, J. and Berkhout, A. (2009). Chinese Driving Behavior in Nanjing Calibrating VISSIM Parameters, http://projectnanjing2009. nl/index_files/projectdocumenten.htm.Google Scholar
  28. Shalaby, A., Lee, J., John, G., Hung, S., and Bowie, M. (2006). “Development, evaluation, and selection of advanced transit signal priority concept directions.” Journal of Public Transportation, Vol. 9, No. 5, pp. 97–120.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Skabardonis, A. (2000). “Control strategies for transit priority.” Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board, Vol. 1727, pp. 20–26, DOI: 10.3141/1727-03.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Stevanovic, J., Aleksandar, S., Peter, M. T., and Bauer, T. (2008). “Stochastic optimization of traffic control and transit priority settings in VISSIM.” Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies Vol. 16, pp. 332–349, DOI: 10.1016/j.trc.2008.01.002.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Sunkari, S. R., Beasley, P. S., Urbanik, T., and Fambro, D. B. (1995). “Model to evaluate the impacts of bus priority on signalized intersections.” Transportation Research Record, Vol. 1494, pp. 117–123.Google Scholar
  32. Vanajakshi, L. and Rilett, L. R. (2004). “A comparison of the performance of artificial neural networks and support vector machines for the prediction of traffic speed.” Intelligent Vehicles Symposium, IEEE, DOI: 10.1109/IVS.2004.1336380.Google Scholar
  33. Wadjas, Y. and Furth, P. G. (2003). “Transit signal priority along an arterial using advanced detection.” Transportation Research Board, Washington, D.C..Google Scholar
  34. Wei, C. and Gu, B. (2008). “The typical modern tram systems in europe.” Urban Mass Transit, Vol. 11, No. 1, pp. 11–14, DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1007-869X.2008.01.004.Google Scholar
  35. Wei, Z. C., Yu, X. Z., and Deng, Z. G.. (2010). “Application of modern tram and simple contact suspension.” Modern Urban Transit, Vol. 2, No. 5, pp. 15–18.Google Scholar
  36. Yagar, S. (1993). “Efficient transit priority at intersections.” Transportation Research Record, Vol. 1390.Google Scholar
  37. Yang, M., Ding, J. and Wang, B. J. (2015). Research on Maximizing the Capacity at Intersections under the Operation of Modern Trams, Southeast University, 2015.Google Scholar
  38. Yang, M., Sun, G., Wang, W., Sun, X., Ding, J., and Han, J. (2015). “Evaluation of the pre-detective signal priority for bus rapid transit: Coordinating the primary and secondary intersections.” Transport (online), DOI: 10.3846/16484142.2015.1004556.Google Scholar
  39. Zhou, G. and Gan, A. (2009). “Design of transit signal priority at signalized intersections with queue jumper lanes.” Journal of Public Transportation, Vol. 12, No. 4, pp. 117–132, DOI: 10.5038/2375-0901.12.4.7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Korean Society of Civil Engineers and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of TransportationSoutheast UniversityNanjingP. R. China
  2. 2.Zhejiang Provincial Institute of Communications Planning, Design and Research, Westlake DistrictHangzhouP.R. China

Personalised recommendations