Learning Climate and Innovative Work Behavior, the Mediating Role of the Learning Potential of the Workplace

Abstract

This study aims to explore the relationship between learning climate, in the dimensions of learning facilitation and error avoidance, learning potential of the workplace (task-related and interactional) and innovative work behavior. Survey data were collected from a sample of 374 employees and their supervisors from an automatic food distribution company in central Italy. Structural equation models have been conducted to empirically test the hypotheses. Results showed that both dimensions of learning climate were related interactional and task-related learning potential and that task-related learning potential mediated the relationship between climate and innovative behavior. Furthermore, the climatic dimension of learning facilitation had a direct relationship with innovative work behavior. Advancing from existing organizational behavior and individual learning literature, this article contributes to extend knowledge about the role of learning climate and workplace learning potential in innovative work behavior. The findings offer guidance for organizations that aim to strengthen employee-driven innovation, highlighting the importance of learning climate and potential.

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Cangialosi, N., Odoardi, C. & Battistelli, A. Learning Climate and Innovative Work Behavior, the Mediating Role of the Learning Potential of the Workplace. Vocations and Learning 13, 263–280 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12186-019-09235-y

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Keywords

  • Innovative work behavior
  • Learning potential
  • Workplace learning
  • Learning climate