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International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 109, Issue 6, pp 673–683 | Cite as

Impact of treatment-related weight changes from diagnosis to hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation on clinical outcome of acute myeloid leukemia

  • Taiki AndoEmail author
  • Shin Fujisawa
  • Haruka Teshigawara
  • Eriko Ogusa
  • Yoshimi Ishii
  • Kazuho Miyashita
  • Kenji Motohashi
  • Takuya Miyazaki
  • Takayoshi Tachibana
  • Maki Hagihara
  • Kenji Matsumoto
  • Masatsugu Tanaka
  • Chizuko Hashimoto
  • Hideyuki Koharazawa
  • Katsumichi Fujimaki
  • Jun Taguchi
  • Hiroyuki Fujita
  • Heiwa Kanamori
  • Etsuko Yamazaki
  • Hideaki Nakajima
  • Yokohama Cooperative Study Group for Hematology (YACHT)
Original Article
  • 72 Downloads

Abstract

We hypothesized that treatment-related weight loss is associated with worse outcomes following HSCT. Overall, 184 patients with AML who underwent induction therapy were classified according to d-BMI (BMI at transplant minus BMI at diagnosis) (kg/m2) as < −2, − 2 to + 2, and > + 2. At 1 year, OS was 67.9% (95% CI, 60.7–74.2), DFS was 64.1% (95% CI, 56.7–70.6), and GRFS was 40.2% (95% CI, 33.1–47.2). For d-BMI groups < − 2, − 2 to + 2, and > + 2, GRFS at 1 year was 16.1% (95% CI, 5.1–31.4), 45.4% (95% CI, 36.4–53.7), and 41.7% (95% CI, 22.2–60.1), respectively (P = 0.0067). Multivariate analysis showed that both worse OS (HR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.02–3.14; P = 0.007) and GRFS (HR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.26–4.35; P = 0.007) were associated with reduced BMI (d-BMI < − 2). Treatment-related weight reduction in AML was associated with poor outcome after HSCT.

Keywords

AML Treatment-related weight loss BMI HSCT 

Notes

Acknowledgements

I appreciate for all authors who participated in the research and preparation of the manuscript. I would like to show my deepest gratitude to my supervisor, Dr. Etsuko-Yamazaki, Dr. Shin-Fujisawa, Dr. Heiwa-Kanamori, and Prof. Hideaki-Nakajima. This work was supported by Yokohama Cooperative Study Group for Hematology (YACHT).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest. A summary of relevant information will be published with the manuscript.

Supplementary material

12185_2019_2647_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (77 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 76 kb)
12185_2019_2647_MOESM2_ESM.pdf (22 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (PDF 22 kb)

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Hematology 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Taiki Ando
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Shin Fujisawa
    • 2
  • Haruka Teshigawara
    • 1
    • 3
  • Eriko Ogusa
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yoshimi Ishii
    • 2
  • Kazuho Miyashita
    • 2
  • Kenji Motohashi
    • 2
  • Takuya Miyazaki
    • 3
  • Takayoshi Tachibana
    • 4
  • Maki Hagihara
    • 3
  • Kenji Matsumoto
    • 3
  • Masatsugu Tanaka
    • 4
  • Chizuko Hashimoto
    • 5
  • Hideyuki Koharazawa
    • 6
  • Katsumichi Fujimaki
    • 7
  • Jun Taguchi
    • 6
  • Hiroyuki Fujita
    • 8
  • Heiwa Kanamori
    • 4
  • Etsuko Yamazaki
    • 3
    • 9
  • Hideaki Nakajima
    • 1
    • 3
  • Yokohama Cooperative Study Group for Hematology (YACHT)
  1. 1.Department of Stem Cell and Immune Regulation, Graduate School of MedicineYokohama City UniversityYokohamaJapan
  2. 2.Department of HematologyYokohama City University Medical CenterYokohamaJapan
  3. 3.Department of Hematology and Clinical Immunology, School of MedicineYokohama City UniversityYokohamaJapan
  4. 4.Department of HematologyKanagawa Cancer CenterYokohamaJapan
  5. 5.Department of Hematology/OncologyYamato Municipal HospitalYamatoJapan
  6. 6.Department of HematologyShizuoka Red Cross HospitalShizuokaJapan
  7. 7.Department of HematologyFujisawa City HospitalFujisawaJapan
  8. 8.Department of HematologySaiseikai Yokohama Nanbu HospitalYokohamaJapan
  9. 9.Clinical Laboratory DepartmentYokohama City University HospitalYokohamaJapan

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