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International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 109, Issue 5, pp 539–544 | Cite as

Impact of CD123 expression, analyzed by immunohistochemistry, on clinical outcomes in patients with acute myeloid leukemia

  • Nana AraiEmail author
  • Mayumi Homma
  • Maasa Abe
  • Yuta Baba
  • So Murai
  • Megumi Watanuki
  • Yukiko Kawaguchi
  • Shun Fujiwara
  • Nobuyuki Kabasawa
  • Hiroyuki Tsukamoto
  • Yui Uto
  • Hirotsugu Ariizumi
  • Kouji Yanagisawa
  • Norimichi Hattori
  • Bungo Saito
  • Eisuke Shiozawa
  • Hiroshi Harada
  • Toshiko Yamochi-Onizuka
  • Tsuyoshi Nakamaki
  • Masafumi Takimoto
Original Article

Abstract

Aberrant expression of the interleukin-3 receptor alpha chain (IL3RA or CD123) is frequently observed in patients with a subset of leukemic disorders, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), particularly in leukemia stem cells. We analyzed the relationships between immunohistochemical (IHC) expression, including that of CD123, and clinical outcomes. This study involved a retrospective analysis of 48 patients diagnosed with de novo AML (M0–M5, n = 48) at our hospital between February 2008 and September 2015. Among patients with de novo AML, CD123 expression was associated with a failure to achieve complete response (CR) to initial induction chemotherapy (P = 0.044) and poor overall survival (OS) (P = 0.036). This is the first study using IHC to demonstrate that CD123 expression is associated with a poor CR rate and poor OS in de novo AML patients. These results support previous reports using flow cytometry (FCM). CD123 expression may thus be useful for assessing AML patients’ prognoses. At the time of diagnosis, CD123 expression analysis using IHC may represent a clinically useful assessment for de novo AML patients.

Keywords

CD123 expression P53 expression Acute myeloid leukemia Immunohistochemistry (IHC) 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We wish to thank all physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and support personnel for their care of patients in this study.

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Copyright information

© Japanese Society of Hematology 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nana Arai
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Mayumi Homma
    • 1
  • Maasa Abe
    • 2
  • Yuta Baba
    • 2
  • So Murai
    • 2
  • Megumi Watanuki
    • 2
  • Yukiko Kawaguchi
    • 2
  • Shun Fujiwara
    • 2
  • Nobuyuki Kabasawa
    • 2
  • Hiroyuki Tsukamoto
    • 2
  • Yui Uto
    • 2
  • Hirotsugu Ariizumi
    • 2
  • Kouji Yanagisawa
    • 2
  • Norimichi Hattori
    • 2
  • Bungo Saito
    • 2
  • Eisuke Shiozawa
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Harada
    • 3
  • Toshiko Yamochi-Onizuka
    • 1
  • Tsuyoshi Nakamaki
    • 2
  • Masafumi Takimoto
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PathologyShowa University School of MedicineTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Division of Hematology, Department of MedicineShowa University School of MedicineShinagawa-KuJapan
  3. 3.Division of Hematology, Department of MedicineShowa University Fujigaoka HospitalKanagawaJapan

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