International Journal of Hematology

, Volume 106, Issue 4, pp 517–521 | Cite as

Administration of direct oral anticoagulants in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms

  • Jean-Christophe Ianotto
  • Marie-Anne Couturier
  • Hubert Galinat
  • Dominique Mottier
  • Christian Berthou
  • Gaëlle Guillerm
  • Eric Lippert
  • Aurélien Delluc
Original Article

Abstract

Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been approved to treat and prevent thrombotic events. However, they are not yet labeled for use in patients with active cancers. Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are clonal chronic disorders with a high incidence of thrombotic events, for which low-dose aspirin (LDA) is the standard drug treatment. We analyzed efficacy and safety of DOACs prescription in patients treated for MPNs. An MPN database, the OBENE registry, was established at our institution. We collected biological and clinical data from diagnosis to last follow-up for every patient included in this study. Thrombotic and hemorrhagic events and hematologic evolutions were categorized as major events in the database. Of the 760 MPN patients in the OBENE registry, 25 (3.3%) were treated with a DOAC. Median follow-up duration was 2.1 years (0.12–4.3 years). The reasons for prescribing DOACs were atrial fibrillation and thrombotic events for 13 and 12 patients, respectively. We only observed one thrombotic event (4%) and three major hemorrhagic events (12%). A case–control study did not detect a significant difference in thrombotic or hemorrhagic events in patients treated with LDA and DOACs. These preliminary results suggest that DOACs may be highly efficient and safe for use in MPN patients.

Keywords

DOAC Essential thrombocythemia Hemorrhage Polycythemia vera Thrombosis 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Hematology 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jean-Christophe Ianotto
    • 1
    • 2
  • Marie-Anne Couturier
    • 1
  • Hubert Galinat
    • 3
  • Dominique Mottier
    • 2
    • 4
  • Christian Berthou
    • 1
  • Gaëlle Guillerm
    • 1
  • Eric Lippert
    • 3
  • Aurélien Delluc
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.Service d’Hématologie Clinique, Institut de Cancéro-HématologieCHRU de BrestBrestFrance
  2. 2.INSERM EA-3878, GETBO (Groupe d’étude de la thrombose en Bretagne occidentale), CHRU de BrestBrestFrance
  3. 3.Laboratoire d’HématologieCHRU de BrestBrestFrance
  4. 4.Département de Médecine Interne et de PneumologieCHRU de BrestBrestFrance

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