Food Analytical Methods

, Volume 10, Issue 6, pp 1736–1744 | Cite as

Quantification of Piperazine in Chicken Muscle by Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry

  • Kaizhou Xie
  • Ya’nan Liu
  • Lirui Sun
  • Maoda Pang
  • Xing Xie
  • Qiang Gao
  • Bo Wang
  • Yangyang Zhang
  • Ran Wang
  • Genxi Zhang
  • Guojun Dai
  • Jinyu Wang
Article

Abstract

An ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI/MS/MS) method was developed for the detection of piperazine in chicken muscle. Following extraction and purification, the chicken muscle extract was injected into the UPLC system and analyzed. Piperazine detection was performed on a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer with the ESI interface operating in positive mode. The most sensitive mass transition from the precursor ion to the product ion was 87.1 → 44.1 for piperazine. The coefficient (R 2) of piperazine was 0.9995 in the range of 1–200 μg/kg. The recovery and relative standard deviation (RSD) ranged from 102.93 to 111.46% and from 4.57 to 5.28% at 50.0, 100.0 and 200.0 μg/kg adding levels, respectively. Limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs) were 0.4 and 1.0 μg/kg, respectively. This method was fully validated based on its specificity, sensitivity, linearity, precision, accuracy, matrix effect, and stability results. Compared to other researches, this new method not only omitted the derivative process, which simplify the pre-processing, but also proved a better sensitivity based on its low LOD and LOQ values.

Keywords

Piperazine UPLC-ESI/MS/MS Chicken muscle 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was Supported by the China Agriculture Research System (CARS-42-G23), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31302009), the National Science and Technology Pillar Program during the Twelfth Five-year Plan Period of China (2014BAD13B02), the Priority Academic Program Development (PAPD) of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, and the New Century Talent Project of Yangzhou University.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Kaizhou Xie declares that he has no conflict of interest. Ya’nan Liu declares that he has no conflict of interest. Lirui Sun declares that he has no conflict of interest. Maoda Pang declares that he has no conflict of interest. Xing Xie declares that he has no conflict of interest. Qiang Gao declares that he has no conflict of interest. Bo Wang declares that he has no conflict of interest. Yangyang Zhang declares that he has no conflict of interest. Ran Wang declares that he has no conflict of interest. Genxi Zhang declares that he has no conflict of interest. Guojun Dai declares that he has no conflict of interest. Jinyu Wang declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

Informed Consent

Not applicable.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kaizhou Xie
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ya’nan Liu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Lirui Sun
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Maoda Pang
    • 4
  • Xing Xie
    • 4
  • Qiang Gao
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Bo Wang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Yangyang Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ran Wang
    • 4
  • Genxi Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Guojun Dai
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jinyu Wang
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.College of Animal Science and TechnologyYangzhou UniversityYangzhouChina
  2. 2.Key Laboratory for Animal Genetic, Breeding, Reproduction and Molecular Design of Jiangsu ProvinceYangzhouChina
  3. 3.Joint International Research Laboratory of Agriculture and Agri-Product SafetyYangzhou UniversityYangzhouChina
  4. 4.Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural SciencesNanjingChina

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