Supervision and health outcomes-A correlational study of LMX, depression and cardiovascular health in a sample of nurses

Abstract

Over the past few decades, evidence has accumulated that psychological consequences of work behavior can mount to affect physical health. Still, the connection between leadership behaviors of supervisors and their impact on subordinate mental and physical health remains understudied despite managers being able to mitigate the assignment and impact of difficult and stressful tasks. This study reports correlational findings in a sample of 71 nurses and their work relationship with their supervisor. Participants self-reported supervisory relationship quality measured by the Leader-Member Exchange (LMX) construct and physiological and psychological variables. Nurses with lower supervisory relationship quality reported significantly higher levels of depression, cardiac risk and blood pressure than nurses reporting higher relationship quality. The current research suggests that workplace supervisory relationships may have broader health implications and notes that additional research is needed to understand the impact of the supervisory-subordinate relationship on physical and psychological health.

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Data Availability Statement

The datasets generated during and/or analyzed during the current study are not publicly available because of confidentiality restrictions, but are available from the corresponding author on reasonable request.

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Correspondence to Manuel J. Tejeda.

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Data were collected in compliance with current APA ethical standards. Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study. Participants were informed of the purpose of the research, provided informed consent, and were informed that their research participation was voluntary and that they could withdraw at any time with no consequence.

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Tejeda, M.J. Supervision and health outcomes-A correlational study of LMX, depression and cardiovascular health in a sample of nurses. Curr Psychol (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12144-021-01445-9

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Keywords

  • Workplace health
  • Leadership
  • Supervision
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Depression