Psychometric properties of the PERMA-Profiler as hedonic and eudaimonic well-being measure in an Italian context

Abstract

The aim of this work is to offer an exam of the PERMA-Profiler’s psychometric proprieties in an Italian context, with particular attention to convergent validity measured through one of the most used instruments for assessing psychological well-being, the Ryff’s Psychological Well-Being Scale (Ryff in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 57(6), 1069, 1989, Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 83(1), 10–28, 2014; Italian version by Ruini et al. in Rivista di psichiatria, 38(3), 117–130, 2003). Italian version of PERMA-Profiler appears to have good psychometric qualities, and its factorial structure is consistent with the original one (Butler & Kern in International Journal of Wellbeing, 6(3), 1–48, 2016), in line with Seligman’s PERMA model (Seligman 2011). Although the dimension of Ryff’s Autonomy subscale shows low correlation indices with PERMA subscales, the two Overall dimensions (Overall PERMA and Ryff’s Psychological Well-Being total) show a good relation (r = .81). This data tends to favor the idea that the PERMA-Profiler is an instrument capable of measuring well-being, in a certainly more streamlined way (23-items vs 84-items), from a eudaimonic point of view (Ryff in Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 83(1), 10-28, 2014), and, with its attention to aspects related to positive emotions and happiness (factors Positive emotions and Engagement, and Happiness single-item) the instrument appears to be trans-theoretical, by also offering a hedonic and subjective vision of well-being.

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Correspondence to Barbara Giangrasso.

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Giangrasso, B. Psychometric properties of the PERMA-Profiler as hedonic and eudaimonic well-being measure in an Italian context. Curr Psychol 40, 1175–1184 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12144-018-0040-3

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Keywords

  • PERMA-Profiler
  • Psychologichal well-being
  • Flourishing
  • Wellbeing
  • Measurement
  • Psychometric properties