The Unemancipated Country: Eugene Genovese’s Discovery of the Old South

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Eugene D. Genovese, The Southern Tradition: The Achievement and Limitations of an American Conservatism (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1994), 4–5.

  2. 2.

    Robert William Fogel and Stanley L. Engerman, “Changing Views of Slavery in the United States South: The Role of Eugene D. Genovese,” in Slavery, Secession, and Southern History, ed. Robert Louis Paquette and Louis A. Ferleger (Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 2000), 4–5.

  3. 3.

    David M. Potter, “Right to Defend the Wrong Reasons,” review of The Political Economy of Slavery: Studies in the Economy and Society of the Slave South, by Eugene D. Genovese, Saturday Review, January 1, 1966, 34.

  4. 4.

    Eugene D. Genovese, The Political Economy of Slavery: Studies in the Economy and Society of the Slave South (New York: Vintage Books, 1965), 7–8.

  5. 5.

    Eugene D. Genovese, Roll, Jordan, Roll: The World the Slaves Made (New York: Pantheon Books, 1974), 25–27, 147–49, 440.

  6. 6.

    Elizabeth Fox-Genovese and Eugene D. Genovese, The Mind of the Master Class: History and Faith in the Southern Slaveholders’ Worldview (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2005); Slavery in White and Black: Class and Race in the Southern Slaveholders’ New World Order (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008); and Fatal Self-Deception: Slaveholding Paternalism in the Old South (Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011).

  7. 7.

    Eugene D. Genovese, “The Question,” Dissent 41, no. 3 (Summer 1994): 371–76; Paquette and Ferleger, Slavery, Secession, and Southern History, 197.

  8. 8.

    Eugene D. Genovese, From Rebellion to Revolution: Afro-American Slave Revolts in the Making of the Modern World (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1979).

  9. 9.

    “Eugene D. Genovese and History: An Interview,” in Paquette and Ferleger, Slavery, Secession, and Southern History, 198–99.

  10. 10.

    Laura Foner and Eugene D. Genovese, eds., Slavery in the New World: A Reader in Comparative History (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1969), esp. v.

  11. 11.

    Genovese, Roll, Jordan, Roll, 159–284, 598.

  12. 12.

    Orlando Patterson, “The Peculiar Institution Again,” New Republic, November 9, 1974, 37–38.

  13. 13.

    Ibid., 38.

  14. 14.

    William J. Wilson, “Slavery, Paternalism, and White Hegemony,” American Journal of Sociology 81, no. 5 (March 1976): 1190–98.

  15. 15.

    Eugene D. Genovese and Douglas Ambrose, “Masters,” in Oxford Handbook of Slavery in the Americas, ed. Robert L. Paquette and Mark M. Smith (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2010), 535.

  16. 16.

    Ibid., 545.

  17. 17.

    Genovese, “The Question,” 375.

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Paquette, R.L. The Unemancipated Country: Eugene Genovese’s Discovery of the Old South. Acad. Quest. 27, 204–212 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12129-014-9422-7

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Keywords

  • Political Economy
  • Slave Make
  • Classical Political Economy
  • Slave Society
  • Slave Revolt