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Energy Efficiency

, Volume 11, Issue 5, pp 1247–1264 | Cite as

A prototype tool for automatically generating energy-saving advice based on smart meter data

  • Osamu Kimura
  • Hidenori Komatsu
  • Ken-ichiro Nishio
  • Toshihiro Mukai
Original Article

Abstract

As many countries and regions have started large-scale deployment of smart meters, there is a growing amount of data on electricity use available for energy efficiency services. We have developed a novel tool that, based on smart meter data, automatically generates customised energy-saving advice to commercial and industrial customers. This type of audit tool could enormously expand the target of energy audits to almost all small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) with smart metering at a low cost per customer. In this paper, we explain the structure of and approaches that we used in our prototype tool, such as fault detection, energy disaggregation, social comparison and benchmarking and selective visualisation. We also show test case results for the tool by using smart meter data from 34 public buildings in Japan. While the prototype tool presented in this paper has some limitations, the approach and the basic structure of the tool are valuable and provide the basis for more sophisticated tools.

Keywords

Smart meter Energy audit Energy-saving advice Automated tool Small- and medium-sized enterprises 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank the city government for permission to use the electricity demand data of their buildings. This paper is based on a Japanese report by the authors (Komatsu et al. 2016) with substantial modifications.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Central Research Institute of Electric Power IndustryTokyoJapan

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