Dietary Selenized Glucose Increases Selenium Concentration and Antioxidant Capacity of the Liver, Oviduct, and Spleen in Laying Hens

Abstract

Selenized glucose (SeGlu) is a new type of organic selenium (Se) that is synthesized through the selenide reaction of glucose with sodium hydrogen selenide. This study aimed to clarify the influence of dietary SeGlu on the Se level and antioxidant capacity of the liver, oviduct, and spleen in laying hens. A total of 360, 60-week-old, Hy-Line Brown laying hens were randomly assigned to three treatment groups: a basal diet alone (control group, without adding exogenous Se) or the basal diet supplemented with 0.3 mg/kg of Se from sodium selenite (SS) or 5 mg/kg of Se from SeGlu. Diets with SeGlu increased Se levels in the liver, oviduct, and spleen of laying hens (P < 0.001). Compared with the control and SS groups, diet supplemented with SeGlu enhanced glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) in the spleen and oviduct as well as the scavenging ability of 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical (DPPH) in the oviduct (P < 0.05). Compared with the control group, SeGlu treatment resulted in an increase (P < 0.05) in GSH-Px activity, T-AOC, and scavenging abilities of hydroxyl radical and DPPH in the liver of hens. In addition, dietary SeGlu and SS decreased the hydrogen peroxide level in the oviduct in comparison to the control group (P < 0.05). Therefore, dietary SeGlu increased Se concentration and antioxidant ability in the liver, oviduct, and spleen of laying hens. Moreover, SeGlu may be used as a potential source of Se additive in laying hen production.

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Data Availability

All data and material generated or used during the study are available from the corresponding author by request.

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Funding

This work was supported by the Jiangsu Province Major Agricultural New Varieties Creation Project (PZCZ201731), Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD), and Jiangsu Provincial Six Talent Peaks Project (XCL-090).

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Daoqing Gong and Lei Yu conceived and designed the experiments and participated in the final interpretation of the data; Minmeng Zhao, Qingyun Sun, and Mawahib Khedir Khogali acquired and analyzed the data; Minmeng Zhao, Long Liu, and Tuoyu Geng drafted the manuscript, and L. Y. finalized it.

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Correspondence to Daoqing Gong.

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Zhao, M., Sun, Q., Khogali, M.K. et al. Dietary Selenized Glucose Increases Selenium Concentration and Antioxidant Capacity of the Liver, Oviduct, and Spleen in Laying Hens. Biol Trace Elem Res (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12011-021-02603-7

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Keywords

  • Selenized glucose
  • Laying hen
  • Antioxidant capacity
  • Organic selenium
  • Selenium concentration