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Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology

, Volume 163, Issue 1, pp 127–142 | Cite as

AnSBBR Applied to a Personal Care Industry Wastewater Treatment: Effects of Fill Time, Volume Treated Per Cycle, and Organic Load

  • José Alberto Domingues RodriguesEmail author
  • Ricardo Polisaitis Oliveira
  • Suzana Maria Ratusznei
  • Marcelo Zaiat
  • Eugenio Foresti
Article

Abstract

A study was performed regarding the effect of the relation between fill time, volume treated per cycle, and influent concentration at different applied organic loadings on the stability and efficiency of an anaerobic sequencing batch reactor containing immobilized biomass on polyurethane foam with recirculation of the liquid phase (AnSBBR) applied to the treatment of wastewater from a personal care industry. Total cycle length of the reactor was 8 h (480 min). Fill times were 10 min in the batch operation, 4 h in the fed-batch operation, and a 10-min batch followed by a 4-h fed batch in the mixed operation. Settling time was not necessary since the biomass was immobilized and decant time was 10 min. Volume of liquid medium in the reactor was 2.5 L, whereas volume treated per cycle ranged from 0.88 to 2.5 L in accordance with fill time. Influent concentration varied from 300 to 1,425 mg COD/L, resulting in an applied volumetric organic load of 0.9 and 1.5 g COD/L.d. Recirculation flow rate was 20 L/h, and the reactor was maintained at 30 °C. Values of organic matter removal efficiency of filtered effluent samples were below 71% in the batch operations and above 74% in the operations of fed batch followed by batch. Feeding wastewater during part of the operational cycle was beneficial to the system, as it resulted in indirect control over the conversion of substrate into intermediates that would negatively interfere with the biochemical reactions regarding the degradation of organic matter. As a result, the average substrate consumption increased, leading to higher organic removal efficiencies in the fed-batch operations.

Keywords

AnSBBR Personal care industry wastewater Fill time Feed volume Organic load 

Nomenclature

A

inner cross-section area of the reactor, cm2

BA

bicarbonate alkalinity, mg CaCO3/L

TVA

total volatile acids concentration, mg HAc/L

CI

influent organic matter concentration, mg COD/L

CEF

organic matter concentration of filtered effluent samples, mg COD/L

CET

organic matter concentration of unfiltered effluent samples, mg COD/L

CH4

methane concentration, mmol/L

CO2

carbon gas concentration, mmol/L

CS

organic matter concentration of filtered samples, mg COD/L

CX

biomass concentration in the reactor (solids per liquid volume treated per cycle), g TVS/L

C’X

biomass concentration in the reactor (solids per mass of inert support), g TVS/g-foam

RSOLF

removed specific organic load for filtered effluent samples, mg COD/g TVS.d

RSOLT

removed specific organic load for unfiltered effluent samples, mg COD/g TVS.d

AVOL

applied volumetric organic load, mg COD/L.d

RVOLF

removed volumetric organic load for filtered effluent samples, mg COD/L.d

RVOLT

removed volumetric organic load for unfiltered effluent samples, mg COD/L.d

MTVS

total mass of total volatile solids, g TVS

Q

recirculation flow rate, L/h

TSS

concentration of total suspended solids, mg/L

VSS

concentration of volatile suspended solids, mg/L

TS

concentration of total solids, mg/L

TVS

concentration of total volatile solids, mg/L

tB

batch fill time, min

tFB

fed-batch fill time, h

tC

cycle length, h

VI

total influent volume, L

VB

batch influent volume, L

VFB

fed-batch influent volume, L

VRT

volume of liquid medium in the reactor, L

VRS

volume of liquid medium in the reservoir, L

X

biomass amount in the reactor, g TVS

vS

superficial velocity of the liquid medium, cm/s

VU

volume of liquid medium in the system, L

εF

organic matter removal efficiency of filtered effluent samples, %

εT

organic matter removal efficiency of unfiltered effluent samples, %

φ

bed porosity, %

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FPAESP)—processes 05/51.702-9 and 06/58.681-0. We gratefully acknowledge Dr. Baltus C. Bonse for the revision of this paper.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • José Alberto Domingues Rodrigues
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ricardo Polisaitis Oliveira
    • 1
  • Suzana Maria Ratusznei
    • 1
  • Marcelo Zaiat
    • 2
  • Eugenio Foresti
    • 2
  1. 1.Escola de Engenharia Mauá (EEM), Instituto Mauá de Tecnologia (IMT)São Caetano do SulBrazil
  2. 2.Departamento de Hidráulica e Saneamento (SHS), Escola de Engenharia de São Carlos (EESC)Universidade de São Paulo (USP)São CarlosBrazil

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