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CORR Insights®: Do Corresponding Authors Take Responsibility for Their Work? A Covert Survey

The Original Article was published on 15 August 2014

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Vance W. Berger PhD.

Additional information

This CORR Insights® is a commentary on the article “Do Corresponding Authors Take Responsibility for Their Work? A Covert Survey” by Teunis and colleagues available at: DOI: 10.1007/s11999-014-3868-3.

The author certifies that he, or any member of his immediate family, has no funding or commercial associations (eg, consultancies, stock ownership, equity interest, patent/licensing arrangements, etc) that might pose a conflict of interest in connection with the submitted article.

All ICMJE Conflict of Interest Forms for authors and Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research ® editors and board members are on file with the publication and can be viewed on request.

The opinions expressed are those of the writers, and do not reflect the opinion or policy of CORR ® or the Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons®.

This CORR Insights® comment refers to the article available at DOI: 10.1007/s11999-014-3868-3.

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Berger, V.W. CORR Insights®: Do Corresponding Authors Take Responsibility for Their Work? A Covert Survey. Clin Orthop Relat Res 473, 736–737 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11999-014-3914-1

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Keywords

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