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Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery—What Does Certification Mean?

  • Steven J. Weissbart
  • Alan J. Wein
  • Ariana L. Smith
Female Urology (L Cox, Section Editor)
  • 141 Downloads
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Female Urology

Abstract

Purpose of Review

There are advantages and disadvantages of subspecialty certification for physicians, trainees, patients, and society at large. As female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery (FPMRS) became the second subspecialty of urology to offer subspecialty certification, understanding the effects of FPMRS subspecialty certification on the healthcare system is important.

Recent Findings

While subspecialty certification may improve training, identify experts, and ultimately lead to improved patient outcomes, certification might also be unnecessary for some physicians, weaken residency training, and limit the number of physicians who are deemed qualified to offer certain treatments. As pelvic floor disorders can considerably affect quality of life, and their prevalence is expected to increase with the aging population, high-quality FPMRS care is needed. In this article, we describe the history of FPMRS subspecialty certification as well as its potential advantages and disadvantages as suggested by literature.

Summary

There are advantages and disadvantages of FPMRS subspecialty certification. Further research is needed to assess the effect of FPMRS subspecialty certification on patient outcomes.

Keywords

Board certification Female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery Patient outcomes 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Steven J. Weissbart, Alan J. Wein, and Ariana L. Smith each declare no potential conflicts of interest.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

References

Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance •• Of major importance

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven J. Weissbart
    • 1
  • Alan J. Wein
    • 2
  • Ariana L. Smith
    • 3
  1. 1.Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Health Sciences TowerStony BrookUSA
  2. 2.Perelman School of MedicineUniversity of Pennsylvania Health SystemPhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.Perelman School of MedicineUniversity of Pennsylvania Health SystemPhiladelphiaUSA

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